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In Focus – 12/17/17 – Michele with Alcoholics Anonymous

Airdate: 12/17/17

Guest: Michele with Alcoholics Anonymous

Senior FBI agent removed from Mueller’s team repeatedly called Trump ‘an idiot’

Senior FBI agent removed from Mueller’s team repeatedly called Trump ‘an idiot’

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The senior FBI agent removed from special counsel Robert Mueller’s team over the summer repeatedly called President Donald Trump “an idiot,” and said the Republican Party “needs to pull their head out of their” rear-ends, according to text messages he sent to an FBI colleague that were reviewed Tuesday by ABC News.

ABC News first reported in August that Peter Strzok, who had been tapped only weeks earlier by Mueller to help lead the probe of alleged Russian meddling in last year’s presidential election, had left Mueller’s team. Strzok is now working for the FBI’s Human Resources Division.

The Justice Department’s inspector general, looking into an array of FBI actions tied to last year’s election, found the text messages sent between Strzok and FBI attorney Lisa Page, who also worked on Mueller’s team into the summer.

Even without knowing the contents of those messages, Trump and fellow Republicans seized on the news, using it to question the integrity of Mueller’s probe.

But now lawmakers know exactly what Strzok said in those messages, after the Justice Department sent copies of them to House and Senate committees on Tuesday night.

“God trump is a loathsome human,” Page texted Strzok on March 4, 2016, the day after a Republican primary debate.

Strzok responded, “Yet he may win,” adding later, “Omg he’s an idiot.”

In the early morning of Oct. 20, 2016, hours after the final debate between Trump and Hillary Clinton, Strzok texted, “I am riled up. Trump is [an] idiot, is unable to provide a coherent answer.”

Numerous times over the next several months, Strzok expressed concern that “the absolute bigoted nonsense of Trump,” as he called it, could incite racial tensions inside the United States. “I am worried about what Trump is encouraging in our behavior,” he wrote to Page on Aug. 14, 2016. “The things that made me proud about our tolerance for dissent — what makes us different from Sunnis and Shias losing each other up — is disappearing.”

And then on Nov. 21, 2016, after Trump had been elected the next president of the United States, Strzok told Page that he was “worried racial tension is going to get really bad.”

In all, ABC News reviewed more than 375 messages exchanged between Strzok and Page from August 2015 to December 2016.

Their criticisms were not only aimed at Trump; they also targeted other Republican candidates for president and former Attorney General Eric Holder.

Strzok has spent much of his law enforcement career working counterintelligence cases, and he has been widely praised by federal law enforcement officials who spoke with ABC News.

According to The Washington Post, Strzok and Page were involved in a romantic relationship.

“Immediately upon learning of the allegations, the Special Counsel’s Office removed Peter Strzok from the investigation,” Mueller spokesman Peter Carr said in a recent statement. “Lisa Page completed her brief [assignment] and had returned to the FBI weeks before our office was aware of the allegations.”

During a House hearing last week, FBI Director Chris Wray disputed any suggestions that FBI agents bring inappropriate biases to their work.

“The FBI that I see is tens of thousands of agents and analysts and staff working their tails off to keep Americans safe from the next terrorist attack, gang violence, child predators, spies from Russia, China, North Korea and Iran,” Wray said. “The FBI that I see is tens of thousands of brave men and women who are working as hard as they can to keep people that they will never know safe from harm.”

He continued, “The FBI that I see is people -– decent people – committed to the highest principles of integrity, professionalism and respect.”

Wray noted that the Justice Department’s “outside” and “independent” inspector general is currently looking into allegations related to Strzok and others. “And when that independent fact-finding is complete, we will hold our folks accountable if that’s appropriate,” he said.


Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Doug Jones wins Alabama Senate race in seismic Democratic victory

Doug Jones, a Democratic former U.S. attorney whose long-shot candidacy was bolstered by a wave of sexual misconduct accusations against his opponent Roy Moore, will win the special election to become Alabama’s junior U.S. senator, ABC News can project, based on its analysis of the vote.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting as of 12:00 a.m. ET Monday, Jones led Moore by a 49.9-48.4 percent margin, a difference of just under 21,000 votes; slightly more than 22,000 voters cast write-in ballots.

Jones’ victory is the first by a Democrat in an Alabama Senate race in 25 years and a powerful rebuke to both the Republican party, which sees it’s majority in the Senate cut to a single legislator, and President Donald Trump who supported two consecutive losing candidates in the race to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former seat.

The outcome is also the latest showcase of strength in the ongoing movement of backlash against alleged sexual harassers and assaulters. Starting in early November, Moore faced accusations from eight women that he engaged in sexual misconduct, including that he initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl in 1979 when he was 32.

Majority of Ala. voters say Moore allegations were minor or no factor, exit polls indicate

OPINION: Alabama Senate race highlights new ‘tribalism’ that threatens our democracy

Moore denied all of the claims and steadfastly remained in the race, even as members of his own party called for him to drop out and pledged to initiate his expulsion from the Senate if he were to win. As a result, Jones’ campaign received the shot in the arm that resulted in a Democrat capturing one of the state’s Senate seats for the first time since Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., then a Democrat, first won election in 1992.

Jones portrayed his win Tuesday evening as a sign to the rest of the country, saying during his victory speech that Alabama showed the U.S. that “we can be unified.” He further praised the state for reversing course after a history of what he described as poor decisions.

“Alabama has been at a crossroads, we’ve been at a crossroads in the past and we’ve usually taken the wrong fork,” said Jones. “Tonight, ladies and gentleman, you took the right road.”

Calling it his “lifelong dream” to serve in the Senate, Jones further expressed pride at running a campaign he said was “about dignity and respect” and “common courtesy and decency.”

PHOTO: Frannie James talks with Connor Welch during an election-night watch party for Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Doug Jones, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala.John Bazemore/AP
Frannie James talks with Connor Welch during an election-night watch party for Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Doug Jones, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala.
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Speaking just after 11:30 p.m. ET, Moore refused to concede, raising the possibility of a recount and saying that he would “wait on God and let this process play out.”

“It’s not over,” said Moore.

Prior to the accusations of sexual misconduct, Moore had already earned a long-standing reputation as a fierce defender of Christianity in the public sphere. His two stints as chief justice ended when he was removed from office for refusing to displace a Ten Commandments monument from the lobby of the Alabama Judicial Building, and, over a decade later when he resigned after he was suspended for ordering state judges to uphold a ban on same-sex marriages.

The Senate race has created a wedge between many prominent Republicans on Capitol Hill, who have maintained that Moore should step aside, and Trump, who endorsed Moore.

While he did not campaign in Alabama, Trump urged voters to support Moore at a weekend rally in Pensacola, Florida, roughly 20 miles from the Alabama state line and close enough to be seen in the Alabama media market.

The president also recorded a robocall over the weekend urging Alabama voters to back Moore.

PHOTO: Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off stage saying he would not concede defeat till all the votes were in and possibly demand a recount, at his watch party in Montgomery, Ala., Dec. 12, 2017.Dan Anderson/EPA
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off stage saying he would not concede defeat till all the votes were in and possibly demand a recount, at his watch party in Montgomery, Ala., Dec. 12, 2017.
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“Roy Moore is the guy we need to pass our ‘Make America Great Again’ agenda,” Trump said on the call, adding, “Roy is a conservative who will help me steer this country back on track after eight years of the Obama disaster. Get out and vote for Roy Moore.”

Trump also argued that Moore has consistently denied the allegations as part of his rationale for endorsing him.

After a number of news organizations projected Jones the winner Tuesday evening, Trump tweeted his congratulations to the Democrat, but pledged the GOP would keep the senator-elect’s seat in its sights.

“Congratulations to Doug Jones on a hard fought victory. The write-in votes played a very big factor, but a win is a win. The people of Alabama are great, and the Republicans will have another shot at this seat in a very short period of time. It never ends!”

National Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., called on Moore to step aside in the wake of the sexual misconduct accusations, but Moore remained defiant. Republican senators from Jeff Flake of Arizona to Lindsey Graham of South Carolina expressed views that Moore is not fit to serve, and Flake went so far as to donate $100 to the Jones campaign.

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., the head of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, said prior to the vote that even if Moore should win the election, he should be expelled from the United States Senate.

Shelby, Alabama’s senior senator, was particularly outspoken about not backing Moore.

“I wouldn’t vote for Roy Moore. I think the Republican Party can do better,” Shelby said Sunday on CNN.

But despite the allegations and widespread backlash against Moore, Jones faced an uphill battle in a state that Trump won by over 20 points in 2016.

PHOTO: A supporter of Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore watches results at an election night party in Montgomery, Ala., on Dec. 12, 2017.Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
A supporter of Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore watches results at an election night party in Montgomery, Ala., on Dec. 12, 2017.
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Moore strongly embraced the president, and painted Jones, who was appointed as a U.S. attorney by Bill Clinton in 1997, as too liberal on issues such as illegal immigration, abortion and same-sex marriage.

Jones, in turn, pitched himself as a politician who would reach across party lines, and ran a campaign focused on turning out African American voters and Alabama Republicans skeptical of the former chief justice both before and after the allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced.

This past weekend Jones campaigned across the state with numerous high-profile African-American politicians, including Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Alabama’s only Democrat in the House, Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala.

Jones further saved his fiercest attacks on Moore for the final weeks of the campaign.

“I damn sure believe that I have done my part to ensure that men who hurt little girls should go to jail and not the U.S. Senate,” Jones said at a campaign rally in Birmingham last week.

Robert Mueller is attempting a coup. Here’s why.

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Listen To You Tell Me Texas Friday 12/8/17

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The initial reaction by the Left to Donald Trump’s election victory was predictable. The hair pulling and shrieking and shouting of vulgarities is pretty much standard lefty fare.

The female-organ shaped hats and the marching in the streets and the foaming at the mouth on the cable chat shows were all to be expected. When lefties don’t get their way, they throw temper tantrums. (When was the last time you saw a march or a demonstration led by disaffected conservatives?)

When Trump surprised everybody and won, I knew that all hell was about to break out on the Left.

But here’s where I got it wrong.

I was naïve enough to believe that it would all die down by now. It hasn’t and it’s now clear that it won’t.

Democrats and establishment Republicans and Never Trumpers and deep-staters and all of the denizens of the swamp have been made crazy by the electoral map. They just can’t understand it. Look at it and you’ll see why.

The map shows in stark relief that Donald Trump won the majority of the votes in a majority of the counties in a majority of the states.

Forget Hillary’s empty assertion that she won the popular vote. It’s meaningless. She didn’t win the country. Donald Trump did.

But how?

A guy that I interviewed in Manchester during the New Hampshire primary, who told me that he had just voted for Trump, explained why in a few simple words.

He says on TV what I yell at my TV.”


Millions of Americas in the vast heartland, that for at least 20 years have been dismissed and condescended to by the Washington establishment and the elite media finally had enough. They found their voice in a gruff, often uncouth political novice.

The Left still doesn’t know what hit them and they’re still unable to accept it.

Thus we get Robert Mueller as special counsel leading an investigation predicated on a completely fabricated “Russian dossier.” That special counsel’s office then gets filled with openly partisan lawyers and investigators. At the investigation’s nexus stands a guy named Peter Strzok, an FBI agent and rabid Democrat partisan who left a trail of text messages to his mistress in which he expresses complete loathing for Donald Trump.

FBI agents are supposed to be above such things. This guy isn’t. That he has now been demoted is of little consequence at this late date. The damage is done.

What’s going on before our very eyes is nothing less than a coup attempt being led by current and former top officials of the FBI. Unthinkable but true.

But Mueller should be very, very careful. Those people in that sea of red counties in the heartland won’t be easily dismissed any more. They’re awake and they’re plenty t’eed off. If you don’t believe it, stand back and watch what happens when someone tries to nullify their vote.

in Focus – 12/10/17 – Carianne Fisher and Flo Limehouse, Therapet

Airdate: 12/10/17

Guests: Carianne Fisher and Flo Limehouse, Therapet

In Focus – 12/3/17 – Jackie Cannon, Champions for Children

Airdate: 12/3/17

Guest: Jackie Cannon, Champions for Children

‘Gomer Pyle’ star Jim Nabors dies at 87

“Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.” star Jim Nabors died peacefully at his home in Hawaii early Thursday, his assistant at Naborly Productions confirmed for ABC News. He was 87.

Nabors, an Alabama native, got his big break in the 1960s as Gomer Pyle on “The Andy Griffith Show.” He followed that by headlining a spin-off show named after his character from 1964 to 1969.

After walking away from his role as Pyle, Nabors was featured in other iconic series like “The Love Boat” and “The Carol Burnett Show.” He stopped acting in the early 1990s.

PHOTO: Jim Nabors poses as character Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Hollywood, June 14, 1965. CBS via Getty Images
Jim Nabors poses as character Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Hollywood, June 14, 1965.

PHOTO: Actor Jim Nabors grins in a scene from an episode of the television comedy series Gomer Pyle, USMC called Dance, Marine, Dance, Sept. 30, 1964.CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images
Actor Jim Nabors grins in a scene from an episode of the television comedy series ‘Gomer Pyle, USMC’ called ‘Dance, Marine, Dance,’ Sept. 30, 1964.
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But Nabors was far more than just an actor. As a singer, he recorded more than 20 albums, several of which went gold, including 1966’s “Jim Nabors Sings Love Me With All Your Heart.” His album “The Heart Touching Magic of Jim Nabors” went platinum in 1980.

He sang “Back Home Again” in Indiana to start the Indianapolis 500 every year from 1972 until his final live appearance in 2014.

Nabors is survived by his husband, Stan Cadwallader, who was his partner for almost 40 years before they tied the knot in 2013.

Pope Francis arrives in Myanmar to cheers, Rohingya diplomatic test

(NEW YORK) — Pope Francis arrived in Myanmar’s largest city, Yangon, today to cheers from groups of children waving Vatican flags and singing “Viva Papa!” It was a happy, warm welcome for the first ever papal visit to Myanmar.

But Pope Francis’s trip will be dominated by how to address the country’s ongoing crackdown on its Muslim Rohingya minority, which has included mass shootings, systemic rape and the burning of villages by the armed forces. The military’s actions amount to ethnic cleansing, according to the United States and United Nations.

The 80-year-old pontiff met Monday afternoon with Myanmar’s General Min Aung Hlaing, the man accused by rights groups of crimes against humanity. It was a quick meeting that included an exchange of gifts and only a short statement confirming that the two men had discussed the “great responsibility of the authorities to the country in this moment of transition.”

But Francis’ very presence in Myanmar could further complicate a very delicate situation, and so he will likely steer clear of any direct mention of the Rohingya, preferring instead to highlight the plight of all minorities in the country. Choosing to meet the generals first, which was a last-minute change to the schedule, was possibly an attempt to further calm the Burmese authorities.

On Tuesday, the pope is scheduled to meet with Myanmar’s president, some of the country’s religious leaders and Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s de facto leader and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. She has been roundly condemned for not speaking out against the horrors faced by the Rohingya. Later in the afternoon, he will give his first speech, the first chance the world will get to see how outspoken the normally plain-speaking Francis will be about the crisis.

A mass will be held on Wednesday before the pope heads to Bangladesh to meet some of the 620,000 Rohingya refugees who have fled persecution. He will also meet with Bangladesh’s prime minister and president, as well as visit a center set up by Mother Theresa to help vulnerable people there. He will also be ordaining Bangladeshi priests, an unusual act for a pope abroad.

With only around 500,000 and 300,000 Catholics in Myanmar and Bangladesh respectively, this trip follows a pattern set by this pope of visiting countries with very few church members. Going to the “peripheries” of his community, as he often calls it, is a duty Pope Francis has said he must undertake.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Glass Doctor of Tyler

Address: 2221 W SW Loop 323 B, Tyler, TX 75701
Phone: (903) 939-3733
Website: https://glassdoctor.com/
Contact: https://glassdoctor.com/contact-us

Teacher of the Month – December 2017

Lindale ISD – Natalie Brown – Lindale Early Childhood Center
Chapel Hill ISD – Samantha Butler – Science Chapel Hill High School
Arp ISD – Debbie Taliaferro – 5th Grade – Arp Elementary
Winona ISD – Susan Wade – Winona High School
TISD – Shannon Kinkade – Hogg Middle School

Notorious cult leader and murderer Charles Manson dead in prison at 83

– Notorious cult leader and murderer Charles Manson dead in prison at 83.

Notorious murderer Charles Manson died of natural causes on Sunday evening, according to prison officials. He was 83-years-old.

Manson was deemed responsible for a two-day murderous rampage through southern California in August 1969 that left seven people dead.

Pregnant actress Sharon Tate, hairstylist Jay Sebring, heiress Abigail Folger, writer Wojciech Frykowski and teenager Steven Parent, were killed at Tate’s rental home on Aug. 9.

The five were murdered in the California home Tate rented with her husband, Hollywood director Roman Polanski, in the secluded neighborhood of Benedict Canyon.

The next day, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca were killed at their home.

Meeting Charles Manson in prison made ‘the hair on the back of my neck’ stand up, says former ABC News sound man

How a KABC News crew and a 10-year-old boy helped with the Charles Manson family murder investigation

Mother was ‘screaming’: Relatives of Sharon Tate, Jay Sebring recall learning of Manson family murders

Charles Manson Follower Leslie Van Houten’s Role in 1969 Killings

While Manson didn’t commit the killings himself, he commanded others to do so.

Prosecutors said he handed out knives and told his followers to commit savage murders of high-profile people around Los Angeles in a bid to start a race war. All seven victims were brutally stabbed.

Manson shocked the country with his apparent lack of remorse for the horrific murders. He declared “I don’t have any guilt,” to the press ahead of his trial.

Disturbing images of a crazy-eyed Manson, who carved an “X” into his forehead and then turned it into a swastika, were broadcast across the country, adding to the public outcry.

The Los Angeles Association of Deputy District Attorneys released a statement quoting Vincent Bugliosi, the attorney who prosecuted Charles Manson.

“Manson was an evil, sophisticated con man with twisted and warped moral values,” the statement quoted Bugliosi. “Today, Manson’s victims are the ones who should be remembered and mourned on the occasion of his death,” the statement concludes.

Manson’s followers recounted the gory details of the stabbings “with a certain amount of glee” after the August 1969 murders, Diane Lake, a teenager who was in love with Manson at the time, told ABC News.

Manson and three of his followers were convicted in 1971 and sentenced to death, but the death sentences were commuted to life sentences when a California Supreme Court ruling abolished capital punishment in 1972.

Manson had spent nearly five decades behind bars since his conviction and had served time in some of the state’s largest prisons. He was housed in a protective unit at a California state prison in Corcoran prior to his death on Sunday.

ABC News’ Andrew Paparella and Lauren Effron contributed to this report.

In Focus – 11/19/17 – Scott Harrison, East Texas Cornerstone Assistance Network

Airdate: 11/19/17

Guest: Scott Harrison, East Texas Cornerstone Assistance Network

In Focus – 11/12/17 – Zoe Lawhorn Meals on Wheels Ministry

Airdate: 11/12/17

Guest: Zoe Lawhorn Meals on Wheels Ministry

Old Chicago Pizza and Taproom

Address: 405 W SW Loop 323, Tyler, TX 75701
Phone: (903) 534-6580
Website: https://oldchicago.com/locations/tyler
Contact: https://oldchicago.com/contact-us
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OldChicago
Twitter: https://twitter.com/oldchicago1976

Granite Planet

Address: 707 Gilmer Rd, Longview, TX 75604
Phone: (903) 759-4726
Website: http://www.graniteplanetusa.com/
Contact: Graniteplanet2012@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/graniteplanetusa

Cunningham Landscape

Address: Tyler, Texas
Phone: (903) 521-1014
Website: http://cunninghamlandscape-tyler.com/
Contact: brett@cunningham-landscape.com

Voters’ concern about health care boost Northam, corruption a top issue for NJ voters: exit polls

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Pushback against President Donald Trump helped lift Democrats to governorships in the two highest-profile U.S. elections since the 2016 presidential contest.

Phil Murphy, the former U.S. ambassador to Germany, is projected to win New Jersey’s gubernatorial election, based on ABC News’ analysis of the exit poll. Sweeping backlash to the deeply unpopular Chris Christie, a Republican, became a focal point of the campaign that pitted Murphy against the state’s Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno. Based on ABC News’ analysis of the vote, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, will win the Virginia governor’s race.

In Virginia, voters by a 2-1 margin said they were casting their ballot to show opposition to Trump rather than support for him. In New Jersey the margin was 3-1. And Trump’s weak approval rating among voters in Virginia, 40 percent, was weaker still in New Jersey, a dismal 33 percent.

Relatedly, a surge in turnout by politically liberal voters boosted Virginia Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, as did a broad advantage on health care, which voters by a wide margin identified as the top issue in the vote.

Trump’s approval rating in Virginia, notably, was 14 points weaker than that of the incumbent Democratic governor, Terry McAuliffe. Further, 51 percent of voters expressed a favorable attitude toward the Democratic Party overall, vs. 37 percent for the Republican Party.

The gap in the parties’ popularity was even more striking in New Jersey. And again turnout among liberals peaked, at its highest in New Jersey gubernatorial races since 1993. So did turnout among Democrats, who accounted for 44 percent of voters, vs. Republicans’ 29 percent.

VIRGINIA – In the bitterly fought Virginia race, 34 percent of voters in the network exit poll said they were voting to express opposition to Trump, vs. 16 percent who said they were voting to show him support. Gillespie prevailed among those who said the president wasn’t a factor, marking the anti-Trump vote as critical to Northam’s victory.

Turnout by liberals was up sharply from previous gubernatorial contests, to 28 percent of all Virginia voters, up from 18 percent in the 2009 race and 20 percent in 2013. (It was 26 percent in 2016, when Hillary Clinton notched her only southern-state win here.) Conservatives, at 30 percent of voters, were off their 2013 level, 36 percent, and their 2009 share, 40 percent of voters in the state.

Northam won a remarkable 60 percent of women in the state – an even larger share than Clinton’s a year ago – vs. 48 percent of men. He won even more voters under age 30, 67 percent, as well as six in 10 of those age 30 to 44.

Also helpful to Northam was that, given a list of five issues, Virginia voters by a wide margin picked health care as the top concern in their vote for governor; those who did so favored him by 77-22 percent over Gillespie. Other issues offered were gun policy (the two split voters who called it their top issue), and immigration, taxes and abortion (all wins for Gillespie, but not by enough).

Gillespie won vast support from evangelical and working-class whites. Whites overall accounted for 67 percent of voters, the same as in the 2016 presidential race, and down from their 2013 and 2009 shares. They backed Gillespie by a 15-point margin, while Northam won nonwhites overwhelmingly.

Gillespie prevailed on at least one issue: Virginia voters by 57-39 percent said Confederate statues in the state should be left in place, and he won by a wide margin among those who held that view. But Northam led in trust to handle race relations overall. And, perhaps above, all, the anti-Trump tide turned his way.

NEW JERSEY – In New Jersey, the unpopularity of not one but two fellow Republicans doomed Kim Guadagno’s bid for governor: Trump and Gov. Chris Christie alike.

Twenty-nine percent of the state’s voters said they were seeking to express opposition to Trump, nearly three times as many as said they were voting to support him, 11 percent. Given an even split among voters who called Trump a non-issue, the president’s unpopularity was central to Democrat Phil Murphy’s support, as it was for Northam in Virginia.

Christie, for his part, received a strikingly dismal 20 percent approval rating from his state’s voters. And 51 percent said they thought worse of Guadagno, his lieutenant governor, because of her association with him. A mere 4 percent said it made them think better of her.

In a striking turn in the Democrats’ direction, independents in New Jersey favored Murphy over Guadagno, 51-44 percent, after backing Christie by a vast 34-point margin four years ago. And while three in 10 voters overall cited property taxes – a frequent Guadagno talking point – as their central issue, even more said corruption in government was the main issue in their vote, and two in 10 picked health care. Both were strong issues for Murphy.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Even moderate alcohol consumption may increase risk of certain cancers, experts warn

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Consuming alcoholic beverages, even in moderation, may increase your risk of developing certain cancers, according to a new statement released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

“People typically don’t associate drinking beer, wine, and hard liquor with increasing their risk of developing cancer in their lifetimes,” Dr. Bruce Johnson, president of the ASCO, an organization of cancer doctors, said in a statement.

“The link between increased alcohol consumption and cancer has been firmly established,” Johnson added. He said he hopes that this knowledge empowers doctors “to help their patients reduce their risk of cancer.”

The new review of past studies on the link between alcohol and cancer, published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, found that approximately 3.5 percent of all cancer deaths in the U.S. can be attributed to alcohol consumption.

In addition, researchers said that in 2012, approximately 5.5 percent of all new cancer occurrences and 5.8 percent of all cancer deaths globally could be attributed to drinking alcohol.

Although heavy, long-term, drinkers were found to have the greatest risks of developing cancer, even modest alcohol consumption may increase cancer risk, researchers said in the publication.

If a drinker stops consuming alcohol for 20 years or more, however, their risk of cancer reverts back to that of non-drinkers, according to the researchers’ analysis.

The 11-page ASCO statement on alcohol and cancer also says that “associations between alcohol drinking and cancer risk have been observed consistently regardless of the specific type of alcoholic beverages,” meaning the link between alcohol and certain cancers was not specific to consumption of just beer, wine, or other types of liquor.

In addition to increasing risk factors for certain types of cancer, the ASCO review also found that drinking alcohol can have an adverse effect on treatment and outcomes for patients with cancer.

“Limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer,” Dr. Noelle LoConte, one of the publication’s authors and a professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin said in a statement.

LeConte said the new ASCO statement joins other public health organizations “in recognizing that even moderate alcohol use can cause cancer.”

“The good news is that, just like people wear sunscreen to limit their risk of skin cancer, limiting alcohol intake is one more thing people can do to reduce their overall risk of developing cancer,” LoConte added.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Trump warns Kim ‘regime in grave danger…we will not be intimidated’

ABCNews.com(SEOUL) — Invoking an alliance with South Korea “forged in the crucible of war,” President Donald Trump warned the nuclear-armed North Korean regime “not to underestimate us” and called on all nations to “deny it any form of support, supply, or acceptance.”

“I hope I speak not only for our countries, but for all civilized nations, when I say to the North: Do not underestimate us, and do not try us,” Trump warned Wednesday in a sweeping address before the South Korean National Assembly.

“All responsible nations must join forces to isolate the brutal regime of North Korea — to deny it any form of support, supply, or acceptance,” Trump said. “The longer we wait, the greater the danger grows, and the fewer the options become.”

Standing on the dais, just 35 miles from the North Korean border, the president also spoke directly to Kim Jong Un, who he addressed by name.

“The weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. They are putting your regime in grave danger,” Trump said. “North Korea is not the paradise your grandfather envisioned. It is a hell that no person deserves.”

Trump, who in recent days has expressed openness to a “deal” with North Korea, said he remains open to a negotiation but only if “complete and verifiable denuclearization” is on the table.

“We will not be intimidated,” Trump said. “And we will not let the worst atrocities in history be repeated here on the ground we fought and died so hard to secure.”

He added, “If you want peace, you must stand strong at all times.”

President Trump painted a picture of horrific living conditions under dictator Kim Jong Un -– a “twisted regime” he called a “cult” -– describing personal stories of torture and abuse and harrowing attempts to escape.

He accused China and Russia, two financial benefactors of North Korea, for being complicit in the regime’s abuses.

“To those nations that choose to ignore this threat or, worse still, to enable it,” Trump said, “the weight of this crisis is on your conscience.” He urged all countries to sever formal diplomatic recognition of North Korea and end trade and technological ties.

Administration officials have been optimistic that the president’s approach –- starkly different than his predecessors’ at least rhetorically -– may force the Kim regime to improve its behavior and avoid the disastrous last resort of military conflict.

On Monday in South Korea, Trump suggested he could “make a deal” with the regime, urging North Korea to “come to the table,” but would not say whether he still believes direct talks are a waste of time.

In addition, there is big political pressure to relist North Korea as a state sponsor of terror and national security adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters last week the administration is considering it.

“That’s an option that’s under consideration. The president’s Cabinet is looking at this as part of the overall strategy on North Korea,” he said.

A senior administration official told ABC News that conversations are “ongoing” and “fluid” as to when to make the announcement, adding “it’s a matter of when rather than if.”

During his inaugural trip to China, Trump will directly confront President Xi Jingping over North Korea, seeking concrete commitments the country will do more to crack down.

“In the end, we will work things out far better than anyone understands or can appreciate,” Trump said in his speech.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Kremlin quiet as Russia marks Revolution’s 100-year anniversary

Rostislav Netisov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK ) — Russia’s Communists, dwindling in numbers and sidelined by the authorities, on Tuesday marked the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution, the uprising led by Vladimir Lenin and his Bolshevik party in 1917, that led to the creation of the Soviet Union and commenced the spread of Communism around the world.

A few thousand people marched through the center of Moscow, carrying large portraits of Lenin and waving red flags, moving toward the Kremlin and Red Square, off which they held a small rally.

It was one of the few major public events commemorating the centenary, which the Kremlin indicated it wants to be low-key. The Bolshevik’s seizure of power was arguably the 20th century’s defining event, fundamentally altering societies around the world and setting up the century’s central clash, the Cold War. But 100 years on, Russia’s current authorities made clear they consider it now peripheral for the country.

“The revolution is modern Russia’s birth certificate, but Russia does not like what it says,” Maksim Trudolyubov, a political commentator wrote in the newspaper, The Moscow Times.

Over the nights 6 and 7 (Oct. 25 and 26 in Russia’s pre-revolutionary calendar) in 1917, soldiers and sailors loyal to the Bolsheviks seized strategic points in Saint Petersburg. Around 2 a.m., they stormed the Winter Palace, the huge ice-green, colonnaded building that stretches along the city’s river. Tsar Nicholas II, whose palace it had been, had already been toppled by an uprising in February. He had been replaced by the so-called Provisional Government, a group of liberal ministers, who had spent the last few months desperately trying to restore order in the country exhausted by World War I.

The Bolsheviks entered the palace from the square. Unlike in later Soviet depictions, they faced almost no resistance — most of the defenders had fled — after it was shelled from the fortress across the river. Coming through the palace’s tunnel-line corridors, they found the Provisional Government holed up in a dining room off the tsar’s former living quarters and arrested them.

The same day, Lenin declared the Bolsheviks now held power. Within months, they would establish a dictatorship and unleash a savage civil war. Rapid progress in education and industrialization would follow, but it was accompanied by bloody repression climaxing under Stalin.

For 70 years, the Soviet Union celebrated Lenin’s seizure of power as an almost religious holiday, with massive parades. His body remains embalmed in state on Red Square. But it has become an inconvenient event for the Kremlin. Engaged in quashing challenges to its own increasingly authoritarian rule, celebrations of revolution are not appealing. At the same time, current President Vladimir Putin has turned to the Soviet Union as the model for his Russia, making it difficult to ignore its founding event.

“It’s puts Putin in a bind,” said Shield Fitzpatrick, a well-known historian of the revolution and professor emerita at the University of Chicago.

The solution has been to say nothing. In December, Putin declared discussion of the revolution should be left to professional historians. Last week he told the Valdai conference, he hoped the centenary can “draw a line under” the divisions provoked by the revolution. Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters last month the Kremlin saw no reason to mark the occasion. Proposals that Lenin should be removed from Red Square have been dismissed.

Tuesday’s march underlined the Kremlin’s disinterest. The Communists chanted “revolution” as they marched toward the Kremlin, but were channeled tightly between police and wire barriers. Where even a few years ago the march had been allotted Moscow’s main street, now they were squeezed by police onto its pavements. Some of the older Communist marchers rattled the barriers, yelling furiously at police that they had once walked there.

The Kremlin is not alone in its attitude — recent polls show many Russians are deeply ambivalent about the revolution. A poll in October by the Russian Academy of Science showed only 6 percent of Russians feel the revolution is something to be proud of. Some point to the repression that it led to under Stalin, but many seem more troubled by the revolution as a proof of Russia’s weakness at the time.

The result has been muted commemorations, left largely to the Communists, who have hosted a week of events. But even they have often skirted the uprising itself. The party of revolution has grown old too. In Saint Petersburg, it dutifully hosted a conference of “left forces.” At the Tauride Palace, where Lenin established the party, delegations from socialist groups one after another lamented the left’s troubled prospects.

“Maybe Lenin will wake up,” Adrian Larsen Steinboe, a Norwegian delegate, told an ABC News reporter wryly.

Russia’s Communist Party has recently sought to rebrand itself to attract younger members. Part of that involves printing posters showing Marx and Lenin as hipsters. In one, a raffish Lenin in a long red scarf and holding a laptop, looks at the Winter Palace and asks, “Will we take it?” Another shows a picture of a red flag flying over the Kremlin walls with the plaintive date, “201?”

Mostly though, the party has turned toward nostalgia, not for revolutionary upheaval, but for the post-war glory days of the Soviet Union, when many party members were young. At a commemorative concert in Saint Petersburg on Friday, a crowd, mostly in their late sixties, sang along to Soviet-era swing. There were chants of “Lenin lives.” An emcee, also in his sixties, harangued the crowd about the marvels of a first apartment given by the government. “Oh speak of that, speak of that,” he cried, “of the bath!”

Amid the official quiet, Russia’s state media and some cultural institutions have offered hints at how citizens ought to perceive the revolution. Russian state television has aired documentaries suggesting the country’s revolutions were largely foreign-funded plots, a favorite idea of the Kremlin in the present day. Russia 24, the state news channel, ran a program titled “100 Years of the Revolution — A Snare for Russia,” suggesting the 1905 revolution, and by extension 1917, was a conspiracy of American bankers and Japanese generals.

The Kremlin under Putin is a history enthusiast — its avoidance of the revolution itself is notable given how eagerly it makes use of history elsewhere. It has focused recently on building a single continuum of what it considers Russian greatness, from the tsarist empire to the present day, bridged by Stalin.

Putin’s state’s preferred lineage, Trudolyubov said, is Russia’s pre-revolutionary empire. He noted that several of Russia’s key ministries have begun dating their founding to tsarist-era bodies instead of their Soviet forebears.

The now dispossessed Communists who finished Tuesday’s rally put on brave face to ABC News. One man, Aleksey Maksimov, standing in a long gray Stalinist coat and white gloves, and holding a red banner, declaimed, “Communism will not be defeated, it will necessarily come,”he said. “I just can’t tell you which year that will exactly.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Teacher of the Month – November

Lindale ISD – Jennifer King – Lindale High School
Arp ISD – Coach Joe Crawford – Arp High School – Social Studies/Varsity Basketball Coach
Chapel Hill ISD – Amanda Wages – Chapel Hill Middle School
Winona ISD – Rachel Moore – Winona Elementary – 4th Grade Writing
TISD – Oscar Rodriquez – Griffin Elementary

In Focus – 11/5/17 – Melissa Peveto, Junior League of Tyler/Mistletoe and Magic

Airdate: 11/5/17

Guest: Melissa Peveto, Junior League of Tyler/Mistletoe and Magic

Daylight Saving Time 2017 Ends: Turn Clocks Back

Daylight Saving Time 2017 Ends: Turn Clocks Back – An extra hour of sleep is coming your way as Daylight Saving Time ends, but it also means it gets dark much earlier in the evening. Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 5.… Read the rest of the article…

In Focus – 10/29/17 – Maya Bethany, The 1 in 3 Foundation

Airdate: 10/29/17

Guest: Maya Bethany, The 1 in 3 Foundation

In Focus – 10/22/17 – Dr. Richard Idell, UT Health Northeast, discussing the opioid epidemic

Airdate: 10/22/17

Guest: Dr. Richard Idell, UT Health Northeast, discussing the opioid epidemic

In Focus – 10/15/17 – Kelli Miller, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation

Airdate: 10/15/17

Guest: Kelli Miller, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation

In Focus – 10/8/17 – Jennifer Blake, Family Circle of Care

Airdate: 10/8/17

Guest: Jennifer Blake, Family Circle of Care

Tim Jones State Farm

Address: 2106 W Gentry Pkwy #101, Tyler, TX 75702
Phone: (903) 593-4114
Website: https://www.statefarm.com/agent/US/TX/Tyler/Tim-Jones-2VMK41YS000

Gray’s Home Fashion Gallery

Address: 2301 S Broadway Ave, Tyler, TX 75701
Phone: (903) 561-1033
Website: http://www.grayshfg.com/
Contact: http://grayshfg.com/contact/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Grays-Home-Fashion-Gallery-438487696241731/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/grayshomefashio/

Can Lights Tabbed as Likely Source of Golden Corral Fire

TYLER — The Tyler Fire Department Wednesday morning released information about the source of a Tuesday night fire at Golden Corral on South Broadway. Fire officials say the fire started near the southwest corner of the building in the exterior eve with the only ignition source in the area being can lights. The investigator on scene noted that the breaker controlling the lights had been tripped. It was also noted that an electrician had been out recently working on the lights. Most of the fire damage was to the outside of the building with smoke and light fire damage to the interior. There was also water damage to the inside caused by an activated fire sprinkler system and fire suppression activities. There were no injuries reported and no word on when the eatery might reopen.

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In Focus – 12/17/17 – Michele with Alcoholics Anonymous

Posted/updated on: December 18, 2017 at 5:00 am

Airdate: 12/17/17

Guest: Michele with Alcoholics Anonymous

Senior FBI agent removed from Mueller’s team repeatedly called Trump ‘an idiot’

Posted/updated on: December 13, 2017 at 8:18 am

Senior FBI agent removed from Mueller’s team repeatedly called Trump ‘an idiot’

iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The senior FBI agent removed from special counsel Robert Mueller’s team over the summer repeatedly called President Donald Trump “an idiot,” and said the Republican Party “needs to pull their head out of their” rear-ends, according to text messages he sent to an FBI colleague that were reviewed Tuesday by ABC News.

ABC News first reported in August that Peter Strzok, who had been tapped only weeks earlier by Mueller to help lead the probe of alleged Russian meddling in last year’s presidential election, had left Mueller’s team. Strzok is now working for the FBI’s Human Resources Division.

The Justice Department’s inspector general, looking into an array of FBI actions tied to last year’s election, found the text messages sent between Strzok and FBI attorney Lisa Page, who also worked on Mueller’s team into the summer.

Even without knowing the contents of those messages, Trump and fellow Republicans seized on the news, using it to question the integrity of Mueller’s probe.

But now lawmakers know exactly what Strzok said in those messages, after the Justice Department sent copies of them to House and Senate committees on Tuesday night.

“God trump is a loathsome human,” Page texted Strzok on March 4, 2016, the day after a Republican primary debate.

Strzok responded, “Yet he may win,” adding later, “Omg he’s an idiot.”

In the early morning of Oct. 20, 2016, hours after the final debate between Trump and Hillary Clinton, Strzok texted, “I am riled up. Trump is [an] idiot, is unable to provide a coherent answer.”

Numerous times over the next several months, Strzok expressed concern that “the absolute bigoted nonsense of Trump,” as he called it, could incite racial tensions inside the United States. “I am worried about what Trump is encouraging in our behavior,” he wrote to Page on Aug. 14, 2016. “The things that made me proud about our tolerance for dissent — what makes us different from Sunnis and Shias losing each other up — is disappearing.”

And then on Nov. 21, 2016, after Trump had been elected the next president of the United States, Strzok told Page that he was “worried racial tension is going to get really bad.”

In all, ABC News reviewed more than 375 messages exchanged between Strzok and Page from August 2015 to December 2016.

Their criticisms were not only aimed at Trump; they also targeted other Republican candidates for president and former Attorney General Eric Holder.

Strzok has spent much of his law enforcement career working counterintelligence cases, and he has been widely praised by federal law enforcement officials who spoke with ABC News.

According to The Washington Post, Strzok and Page were involved in a romantic relationship.

“Immediately upon learning of the allegations, the Special Counsel’s Office removed Peter Strzok from the investigation,” Mueller spokesman Peter Carr said in a recent statement. “Lisa Page completed her brief [assignment] and had returned to the FBI weeks before our office was aware of the allegations.”

During a House hearing last week, FBI Director Chris Wray disputed any suggestions that FBI agents bring inappropriate biases to their work.

“The FBI that I see is tens of thousands of agents and analysts and staff working their tails off to keep Americans safe from the next terrorist attack, gang violence, child predators, spies from Russia, China, North Korea and Iran,” Wray said. “The FBI that I see is tens of thousands of brave men and women who are working as hard as they can to keep people that they will never know safe from harm.”

He continued, “The FBI that I see is people -– decent people – committed to the highest principles of integrity, professionalism and respect.”

Wray noted that the Justice Department’s “outside” and “independent” inspector general is currently looking into allegations related to Strzok and others. “And when that independent fact-finding is complete, we will hold our folks accountable if that’s appropriate,” he said.


Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Doug Jones wins Alabama Senate race in seismic Democratic victory

Posted/updated on: December 13, 2017 at 8:12 am

Doug Jones, a Democratic former U.S. attorney whose long-shot candidacy was bolstered by a wave of sexual misconduct accusations against his opponent Roy Moore, will win the special election to become Alabama’s junior U.S. senator, ABC News can project, based on its analysis of the vote.

With 100 percent of precincts reporting as of 12:00 a.m. ET Monday, Jones led Moore by a 49.9-48.4 percent margin, a difference of just under 21,000 votes; slightly more than 22,000 voters cast write-in ballots.

Jones’ victory is the first by a Democrat in an Alabama Senate race in 25 years and a powerful rebuke to both the Republican party, which sees it’s majority in the Senate cut to a single legislator, and President Donald Trump who supported two consecutive losing candidates in the race to fill Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ former seat.

The outcome is also the latest showcase of strength in the ongoing movement of backlash against alleged sexual harassers and assaulters. Starting in early November, Moore faced accusations from eight women that he engaged in sexual misconduct, including that he initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old girl in 1979 when he was 32.

Majority of Ala. voters say Moore allegations were minor or no factor, exit polls indicate

OPINION: Alabama Senate race highlights new ‘tribalism’ that threatens our democracy

Moore denied all of the claims and steadfastly remained in the race, even as members of his own party called for him to drop out and pledged to initiate his expulsion from the Senate if he were to win. As a result, Jones’ campaign received the shot in the arm that resulted in a Democrat capturing one of the state’s Senate seats for the first time since Sen. Richard Shelby, R-Ala., then a Democrat, first won election in 1992.

Jones portrayed his win Tuesday evening as a sign to the rest of the country, saying during his victory speech that Alabama showed the U.S. that “we can be unified.” He further praised the state for reversing course after a history of what he described as poor decisions.

“Alabama has been at a crossroads, we’ve been at a crossroads in the past and we’ve usually taken the wrong fork,” said Jones. “Tonight, ladies and gentleman, you took the right road.”

Calling it his “lifelong dream” to serve in the Senate, Jones further expressed pride at running a campaign he said was “about dignity and respect” and “common courtesy and decency.”

PHOTO: Frannie James talks with Connor Welch during an election-night watch party for Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Doug Jones, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala.John Bazemore/AP
Frannie James talks with Connor Welch during an election-night watch party for Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Doug Jones, Dec. 12, 2017, in Birmingham, Ala.
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Speaking just after 11:30 p.m. ET, Moore refused to concede, raising the possibility of a recount and saying that he would “wait on God and let this process play out.”

“It’s not over,” said Moore.

Prior to the accusations of sexual misconduct, Moore had already earned a long-standing reputation as a fierce defender of Christianity in the public sphere. His two stints as chief justice ended when he was removed from office for refusing to displace a Ten Commandments monument from the lobby of the Alabama Judicial Building, and, over a decade later when he resigned after he was suspended for ordering state judges to uphold a ban on same-sex marriages.

The Senate race has created a wedge between many prominent Republicans on Capitol Hill, who have maintained that Moore should step aside, and Trump, who endorsed Moore.

While he did not campaign in Alabama, Trump urged voters to support Moore at a weekend rally in Pensacola, Florida, roughly 20 miles from the Alabama state line and close enough to be seen in the Alabama media market.

The president also recorded a robocall over the weekend urging Alabama voters to back Moore.

PHOTO: Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off stage saying he would not concede defeat till all the votes were in and possibly demand a recount, at his watch party in Montgomery, Ala., Dec. 12, 2017.Dan Anderson/EPA
Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore walks off stage saying he would not concede defeat till all the votes were in and possibly demand a recount, at his watch party in Montgomery, Ala., Dec. 12, 2017.
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“Roy Moore is the guy we need to pass our ‘Make America Great Again’ agenda,” Trump said on the call, adding, “Roy is a conservative who will help me steer this country back on track after eight years of the Obama disaster. Get out and vote for Roy Moore.”

Trump also argued that Moore has consistently denied the allegations as part of his rationale for endorsing him.

After a number of news organizations projected Jones the winner Tuesday evening, Trump tweeted his congratulations to the Democrat, but pledged the GOP would keep the senator-elect’s seat in its sights.

“Congratulations to Doug Jones on a hard fought victory. The write-in votes played a very big factor, but a win is a win. The people of Alabama are great, and the Republicans will have another shot at this seat in a very short period of time. It never ends!”

National Republicans, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., called on Moore to step aside in the wake of the sexual misconduct accusations, but Moore remained defiant. Republican senators from Jeff Flake of Arizona to Lindsey Graham of South Carolina expressed views that Moore is not fit to serve, and Flake went so far as to donate $100 to the Jones campaign.

Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., the head of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, said prior to the vote that even if Moore should win the election, he should be expelled from the United States Senate.

Shelby, Alabama’s senior senator, was particularly outspoken about not backing Moore.

“I wouldn’t vote for Roy Moore. I think the Republican Party can do better,” Shelby said Sunday on CNN.

But despite the allegations and widespread backlash against Moore, Jones faced an uphill battle in a state that Trump won by over 20 points in 2016.

PHOTO: A supporter of Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore watches results at an election night party in Montgomery, Ala., on Dec. 12, 2017.Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images
A supporter of Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore watches results at an election night party in Montgomery, Ala., on Dec. 12, 2017.
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Moore strongly embraced the president, and painted Jones, who was appointed as a U.S. attorney by Bill Clinton in 1997, as too liberal on issues such as illegal immigration, abortion and same-sex marriage.

Jones, in turn, pitched himself as a politician who would reach across party lines, and ran a campaign focused on turning out African American voters and Alabama Republicans skeptical of the former chief justice both before and after the allegations of sexual misconduct surfaced.

This past weekend Jones campaigned across the state with numerous high-profile African-American politicians, including Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and Alabama’s only Democrat in the House, Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala.

Jones further saved his fiercest attacks on Moore for the final weeks of the campaign.

“I damn sure believe that I have done my part to ensure that men who hurt little girls should go to jail and not the U.S. Senate,” Jones said at a campaign rally in Birmingham last week.

Robert Mueller is attempting a coup. Here’s why.

Posted/updated on: December 12, 2017 at 5:32 am
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Listen To You Tell Me Texas Friday 12/8/17

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The initial reaction by the Left to Donald Trump’s election victory was predictable. The hair pulling and shrieking and shouting of vulgarities is pretty much standard lefty fare.

The female-organ shaped hats and the marching in the streets and the foaming at the mouth on the cable chat shows were all to be expected. When lefties don’t get their way, they throw temper tantrums. (When was the last time you saw a march or a demonstration led by disaffected conservatives?)

When Trump surprised everybody and won, I knew that all hell was about to break out on the Left.

But here’s where I got it wrong.

I was naïve enough to believe that it would all die down by now. It hasn’t and it’s now clear that it won’t.

Democrats and establishment Republicans and Never Trumpers and deep-staters and all of the denizens of the swamp have been made crazy by the electoral map. They just can’t understand it. Look at it and you’ll see why.

The map shows in stark relief that Donald Trump won the majority of the votes in a majority of the counties in a majority of the states.

Forget Hillary’s empty assertion that she won the popular vote. It’s meaningless. She didn’t win the country. Donald Trump did.

But how?

A guy that I interviewed in Manchester during the New Hampshire primary, who told me that he had just voted for Trump, explained why in a few simple words.

He says on TV what I yell at my TV.”


Millions of Americas in the vast heartland, that for at least 20 years have been dismissed and condescended to by the Washington establishment and the elite media finally had enough. They found their voice in a gruff, often uncouth political novice.

The Left still doesn’t know what hit them and they’re still unable to accept it.

Thus we get Robert Mueller as special counsel leading an investigation predicated on a completely fabricated “Russian dossier.” That special counsel’s office then gets filled with openly partisan lawyers and investigators. At the investigation’s nexus stands a guy named Peter Strzok, an FBI agent and rabid Democrat partisan who left a trail of text messages to his mistress in which he expresses complete loathing for Donald Trump.

FBI agents are supposed to be above such things. This guy isn’t. That he has now been demoted is of little consequence at this late date. The damage is done.

What’s going on before our very eyes is nothing less than a coup attempt being led by current and former top officials of the FBI. Unthinkable but true.

But Mueller should be very, very careful. Those people in that sea of red counties in the heartland won’t be easily dismissed any more. They’re awake and they’re plenty t’eed off. If you don’t believe it, stand back and watch what happens when someone tries to nullify their vote.

in Focus – 12/10/17 – Carianne Fisher and Flo Limehouse, Therapet

Posted/updated on: December 11, 2017 at 5:41 am

Airdate: 12/10/17

Guests: Carianne Fisher and Flo Limehouse, Therapet

In Focus – 12/3/17 – Jackie Cannon, Champions for Children

Posted/updated on: December 4, 2017 at 4:26 am

Airdate: 12/3/17

Guest: Jackie Cannon, Champions for Children

‘Gomer Pyle’ star Jim Nabors dies at 87

Posted/updated on: November 30, 2017 at 3:26 pm

“Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.” star Jim Nabors died peacefully at his home in Hawaii early Thursday, his assistant at Naborly Productions confirmed for ABC News. He was 87.

Nabors, an Alabama native, got his big break in the 1960s as Gomer Pyle on “The Andy Griffith Show.” He followed that by headlining a spin-off show named after his character from 1964 to 1969.

After walking away from his role as Pyle, Nabors was featured in other iconic series like “The Love Boat” and “The Carol Burnett Show.” He stopped acting in the early 1990s.

PHOTO: Jim Nabors poses as character Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Hollywood, June 14, 1965. CBS via Getty Images
Jim Nabors poses as character Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Hollywood, June 14, 1965.

PHOTO: Actor Jim Nabors grins in a scene from an episode of the television comedy series Gomer Pyle, USMC called Dance, Marine, Dance, Sept. 30, 1964.CBS Photo Archive/Getty Images
Actor Jim Nabors grins in a scene from an episode of the television comedy series ‘Gomer Pyle, USMC’ called ‘Dance, Marine, Dance,’ Sept. 30, 1964.
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But Nabors was far more than just an actor. As a singer, he recorded more than 20 albums, several of which went gold, including 1966’s “Jim Nabors Sings Love Me With All Your Heart.” His album “The Heart Touching Magic of Jim Nabors” went platinum in 1980.

He sang “Back Home Again” in Indiana to start the Indianapolis 500 every year from 1972 until his final live appearance in 2014.

Nabors is survived by his husband, Stan Cadwallader, who was his partner for almost 40 years before they tied the knot in 2013.

Pope Francis arrives in Myanmar to cheers, Rohingya diplomatic test

Posted/updated on: November 27, 2017 at 12:53 pm

(NEW YORK) — Pope Francis arrived in Myanmar’s largest city, Yangon, today to cheers from groups of children waving Vatican flags and singing “Viva Papa!” It was a happy, warm welcome for the first ever papal visit to Myanmar.

But Pope Francis’s trip will be dominated by how to address the country’s ongoing crackdown on its Muslim Rohingya minority, which has included mass shootings, systemic rape and the burning of villages by the armed forces. The military’s actions amount to ethnic cleansing, according to the United States and United Nations.

The 80-year-old pontiff met Monday afternoon with Myanmar’s General Min Aung Hlaing, the man accused by rights groups of crimes against humanity. It was a quick meeting that included an exchange of gifts and only a short statement confirming that the two men had discussed the “great responsibility of the authorities to the country in this moment of transition.”

But Francis’ very presence in Myanmar could further complicate a very delicate situation, and so he will likely steer clear of any direct mention of the Rohingya, preferring instead to highlight the plight of all minorities in the country. Choosing to meet the generals first, which was a last-minute change to the schedule, was possibly an attempt to further calm the Burmese authorities.

On Tuesday, the pope is scheduled to meet with Myanmar’s president, some of the country’s religious leaders and Aung San Suu Kyi, the country’s de facto leader and a Nobel Peace Prize winner. She has been roundly condemned for not speaking out against the horrors faced by the Rohingya. Later in the afternoon, he will give his first speech, the first chance the world will get to see how outspoken the normally plain-speaking Francis will be about the crisis.

A mass will be held on Wednesday before the pope heads to Bangladesh to meet some of the 620,000 Rohingya refugees who have fled persecution. He will also meet with Bangladesh’s prime minister and president, as well as visit a center set up by Mother Theresa to help vulnerable people there. He will also be ordaining Bangladeshi priests, an unusual act for a pope abroad.

With only around 500,000 and 300,000 Catholics in Myanmar and Bangladesh respectively, this trip follows a pattern set by this pope of visiting countries with very few church members. Going to the “peripheries” of his community, as he often calls it, is a duty Pope Francis has said he must undertake.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Glass Doctor of Tyler

Posted/updated on: November 27, 2017 at 9:17 am

Address: 2221 W SW Loop 323 B, Tyler, TX 75701
Phone: (903) 939-3733
Website: https://glassdoctor.com/
Contact: https://glassdoctor.com/contact-us

Teacher of the Month – December 2017

Posted/updated on: December 12, 2017 at 9:22 am

Lindale ISD – Natalie Brown – Lindale Early Childhood Center
Chapel Hill ISD – Samantha Butler – Science Chapel Hill High School
Arp ISD – Debbie Taliaferro – 5th Grade – Arp Elementary
Winona ISD – Susan Wade – Winona High School
TISD – Shannon Kinkade – Hogg Middle School

Notorious cult leader and murderer Charles Manson dead in prison at 83

Posted/updated on: November 20, 2017 at 2:14 am

– Notorious cult leader and murderer Charles Manson dead in prison at 83.

Notorious murderer Charles Manson died of natural causes on Sunday evening, according to prison officials. He was 83-years-old.

Manson was deemed responsible for a two-day murderous rampage through southern California in August 1969 that left seven people dead.

Pregnant actress Sharon Tate, hairstylist Jay Sebring, heiress Abigail Folger, writer Wojciech Frykowski and teenager Steven Parent, were killed at Tate’s rental home on Aug. 9.

The five were murdered in the California home Tate rented with her husband, Hollywood director Roman Polanski, in the secluded neighborhood of Benedict Canyon.

The next day, Leno and Rosemary LaBianca were killed at their home.

Meeting Charles Manson in prison made ‘the hair on the back of my neck’ stand up, says former ABC News sound man

How a KABC News crew and a 10-year-old boy helped with the Charles Manson family murder investigation

Mother was ‘screaming’: Relatives of Sharon Tate, Jay Sebring recall learning of Manson family murders

Charles Manson Follower Leslie Van Houten’s Role in 1969 Killings

While Manson didn’t commit the killings himself, he commanded others to do so.

Prosecutors said he handed out knives and told his followers to commit savage murders of high-profile people around Los Angeles in a bid to start a race war. All seven victims were brutally stabbed.

Manson shocked the country with his apparent lack of remorse for the horrific murders. He declared “I don’t have any guilt,” to the press ahead of his trial.

Disturbing images of a crazy-eyed Manson, who carved an “X” into his forehead and then turned it into a swastika, were broadcast across the country, adding to the public outcry.

The Los Angeles Association of Deputy District Attorneys released a statement quoting Vincent Bugliosi, the attorney who prosecuted Charles Manson.

“Manson was an evil, sophisticated con man with twisted and warped moral values,” the statement quoted Bugliosi. “Today, Manson’s victims are the ones who should be remembered and mourned on the occasion of his death,” the statement concludes.

Manson’s followers recounted the gory details of the stabbings “with a certain amount of glee” after the August 1969 murders, Diane Lake, a teenager who was in love with Manson at the time, told ABC News.

Manson and three of his followers were convicted in 1971 and sentenced to death, but the death sentences were commuted to life sentences when a California Supreme Court ruling abolished capital punishment in 1972.

Manson had spent nearly five decades behind bars since his conviction and had served time in some of the state’s largest prisons. He was housed in a protective unit at a California state prison in Corcoran prior to his death on Sunday.

ABC News’ Andrew Paparella and Lauren Effron contributed to this report.

In Focus – 11/19/17 – Scott Harrison, East Texas Cornerstone Assistance Network

Posted/updated on: November 20, 2017 at 5:23 am

Airdate: 11/19/17

Guest: Scott Harrison, East Texas Cornerstone Assistance Network

In Focus – 11/12/17 – Zoe Lawhorn Meals on Wheels Ministry

Posted/updated on: November 20, 2017 at 5:20 am

Airdate: 11/12/17

Guest: Zoe Lawhorn Meals on Wheels Ministry

Old Chicago Pizza and Taproom

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 10:36 am

Address: 405 W SW Loop 323, Tyler, TX 75701
Phone: (903) 534-6580
Website: https://oldchicago.com/locations/tyler
Contact: https://oldchicago.com/contact-us
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OldChicago
Twitter: https://twitter.com/oldchicago1976

Granite Planet

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 10:27 am

Address: 707 Gilmer Rd, Longview, TX 75604
Phone: (903) 759-4726
Website: http://www.graniteplanetusa.com/
Contact: Graniteplanet2012@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/graniteplanetusa

Cunningham Landscape

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 10:20 am

Address: Tyler, Texas
Phone: (903) 521-1014
Website: http://cunninghamlandscape-tyler.com/
Contact: brett@cunningham-landscape.com

Voters’ concern about health care boost Northam, corruption a top issue for NJ voters: exit polls

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 9:50 am

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Pushback against President Donald Trump helped lift Democrats to governorships in the two highest-profile U.S. elections since the 2016 presidential contest.

Phil Murphy, the former U.S. ambassador to Germany, is projected to win New Jersey’s gubernatorial election, based on ABC News’ analysis of the exit poll. Sweeping backlash to the deeply unpopular Chris Christie, a Republican, became a focal point of the campaign that pitted Murphy against the state’s Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno. Based on ABC News’ analysis of the vote, Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, will win the Virginia governor’s race.

In Virginia, voters by a 2-1 margin said they were casting their ballot to show opposition to Trump rather than support for him. In New Jersey the margin was 3-1. And Trump’s weak approval rating among voters in Virginia, 40 percent, was weaker still in New Jersey, a dismal 33 percent.

Relatedly, a surge in turnout by politically liberal voters boosted Virginia Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, as did a broad advantage on health care, which voters by a wide margin identified as the top issue in the vote.

Trump’s approval rating in Virginia, notably, was 14 points weaker than that of the incumbent Democratic governor, Terry McAuliffe. Further, 51 percent of voters expressed a favorable attitude toward the Democratic Party overall, vs. 37 percent for the Republican Party.

The gap in the parties’ popularity was even more striking in New Jersey. And again turnout among liberals peaked, at its highest in New Jersey gubernatorial races since 1993. So did turnout among Democrats, who accounted for 44 percent of voters, vs. Republicans’ 29 percent.

VIRGINIA – In the bitterly fought Virginia race, 34 percent of voters in the network exit poll said they were voting to express opposition to Trump, vs. 16 percent who said they were voting to show him support. Gillespie prevailed among those who said the president wasn’t a factor, marking the anti-Trump vote as critical to Northam’s victory.

Turnout by liberals was up sharply from previous gubernatorial contests, to 28 percent of all Virginia voters, up from 18 percent in the 2009 race and 20 percent in 2013. (It was 26 percent in 2016, when Hillary Clinton notched her only southern-state win here.) Conservatives, at 30 percent of voters, were off their 2013 level, 36 percent, and their 2009 share, 40 percent of voters in the state.

Northam won a remarkable 60 percent of women in the state – an even larger share than Clinton’s a year ago – vs. 48 percent of men. He won even more voters under age 30, 67 percent, as well as six in 10 of those age 30 to 44.

Also helpful to Northam was that, given a list of five issues, Virginia voters by a wide margin picked health care as the top concern in their vote for governor; those who did so favored him by 77-22 percent over Gillespie. Other issues offered were gun policy (the two split voters who called it their top issue), and immigration, taxes and abortion (all wins for Gillespie, but not by enough).

Gillespie won vast support from evangelical and working-class whites. Whites overall accounted for 67 percent of voters, the same as in the 2016 presidential race, and down from their 2013 and 2009 shares. They backed Gillespie by a 15-point margin, while Northam won nonwhites overwhelmingly.

Gillespie prevailed on at least one issue: Virginia voters by 57-39 percent said Confederate statues in the state should be left in place, and he won by a wide margin among those who held that view. But Northam led in trust to handle race relations overall. And, perhaps above, all, the anti-Trump tide turned his way.

NEW JERSEY – In New Jersey, the unpopularity of not one but two fellow Republicans doomed Kim Guadagno’s bid for governor: Trump and Gov. Chris Christie alike.

Twenty-nine percent of the state’s voters said they were seeking to express opposition to Trump, nearly three times as many as said they were voting to support him, 11 percent. Given an even split among voters who called Trump a non-issue, the president’s unpopularity was central to Democrat Phil Murphy’s support, as it was for Northam in Virginia.

Christie, for his part, received a strikingly dismal 20 percent approval rating from his state’s voters. And 51 percent said they thought worse of Guadagno, his lieutenant governor, because of her association with him. A mere 4 percent said it made them think better of her.

In a striking turn in the Democrats’ direction, independents in New Jersey favored Murphy over Guadagno, 51-44 percent, after backing Christie by a vast 34-point margin four years ago. And while three in 10 voters overall cited property taxes – a frequent Guadagno talking point – as their central issue, even more said corruption in government was the main issue in their vote, and two in 10 picked health care. Both were strong issues for Murphy.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Even moderate alcohol consumption may increase risk of certain cancers, experts warn

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 9:50 am

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Consuming alcoholic beverages, even in moderation, may increase your risk of developing certain cancers, according to a new statement released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

“People typically don’t associate drinking beer, wine, and hard liquor with increasing their risk of developing cancer in their lifetimes,” Dr. Bruce Johnson, president of the ASCO, an organization of cancer doctors, said in a statement.

“The link between increased alcohol consumption and cancer has been firmly established,” Johnson added. He said he hopes that this knowledge empowers doctors “to help their patients reduce their risk of cancer.”

The new review of past studies on the link between alcohol and cancer, published Tuesday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, found that approximately 3.5 percent of all cancer deaths in the U.S. can be attributed to alcohol consumption.

In addition, researchers said that in 2012, approximately 5.5 percent of all new cancer occurrences and 5.8 percent of all cancer deaths globally could be attributed to drinking alcohol.

Although heavy, long-term, drinkers were found to have the greatest risks of developing cancer, even modest alcohol consumption may increase cancer risk, researchers said in the publication.

If a drinker stops consuming alcohol for 20 years or more, however, their risk of cancer reverts back to that of non-drinkers, according to the researchers’ analysis.

The 11-page ASCO statement on alcohol and cancer also says that “associations between alcohol drinking and cancer risk have been observed consistently regardless of the specific type of alcoholic beverages,” meaning the link between alcohol and certain cancers was not specific to consumption of just beer, wine, or other types of liquor.

In addition to increasing risk factors for certain types of cancer, the ASCO review also found that drinking alcohol can have an adverse effect on treatment and outcomes for patients with cancer.

“Limiting alcohol intake is a means to prevent cancer,” Dr. Noelle LoConte, one of the publication’s authors and a professor of medicine at the University of Wisconsin said in a statement.

LeConte said the new ASCO statement joins other public health organizations “in recognizing that even moderate alcohol use can cause cancer.”

“The good news is that, just like people wear sunscreen to limit their risk of skin cancer, limiting alcohol intake is one more thing people can do to reduce their overall risk of developing cancer,” LoConte added.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Trump warns Kim ‘regime in grave danger…we will not be intimidated’

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 9:51 am

ABCNews.com(SEOUL) — Invoking an alliance with South Korea “forged in the crucible of war,” President Donald Trump warned the nuclear-armed North Korean regime “not to underestimate us” and called on all nations to “deny it any form of support, supply, or acceptance.”

“I hope I speak not only for our countries, but for all civilized nations, when I say to the North: Do not underestimate us, and do not try us,” Trump warned Wednesday in a sweeping address before the South Korean National Assembly.

“All responsible nations must join forces to isolate the brutal regime of North Korea — to deny it any form of support, supply, or acceptance,” Trump said. “The longer we wait, the greater the danger grows, and the fewer the options become.”

Standing on the dais, just 35 miles from the North Korean border, the president also spoke directly to Kim Jong Un, who he addressed by name.

“The weapons you are acquiring are not making you safer. They are putting your regime in grave danger,” Trump said. “North Korea is not the paradise your grandfather envisioned. It is a hell that no person deserves.”

Trump, who in recent days has expressed openness to a “deal” with North Korea, said he remains open to a negotiation but only if “complete and verifiable denuclearization” is on the table.

“We will not be intimidated,” Trump said. “And we will not let the worst atrocities in history be repeated here on the ground we fought and died so hard to secure.”

He added, “If you want peace, you must stand strong at all times.”

President Trump painted a picture of horrific living conditions under dictator Kim Jong Un -– a “twisted regime” he called a “cult” -– describing personal stories of torture and abuse and harrowing attempts to escape.

He accused China and Russia, two financial benefactors of North Korea, for being complicit in the regime’s abuses.

“To those nations that choose to ignore this threat or, worse still, to enable it,” Trump said, “the weight of this crisis is on your conscience.” He urged all countries to sever formal diplomatic recognition of North Korea and end trade and technological ties.

Administration officials have been optimistic that the president’s approach –- starkly different than his predecessors’ at least rhetorically -– may force the Kim regime to improve its behavior and avoid the disastrous last resort of military conflict.

On Monday in South Korea, Trump suggested he could “make a deal” with the regime, urging North Korea to “come to the table,” but would not say whether he still believes direct talks are a waste of time.

In addition, there is big political pressure to relist North Korea as a state sponsor of terror and national security adviser H.R. McMaster told reporters last week the administration is considering it.

“That’s an option that’s under consideration. The president’s Cabinet is looking at this as part of the overall strategy on North Korea,” he said.

A senior administration official told ABC News that conversations are “ongoing” and “fluid” as to when to make the announcement, adding “it’s a matter of when rather than if.”

During his inaugural trip to China, Trump will directly confront President Xi Jingping over North Korea, seeking concrete commitments the country will do more to crack down.

“In the end, we will work things out far better than anyone understands or can appreciate,” Trump said in his speech.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Kremlin quiet as Russia marks Revolution’s 100-year anniversary

Posted/updated on: November 8, 2017 at 9:51 am

Rostislav Netisov/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(NEW YORK ) — Russia’s Communists, dwindling in numbers and sidelined by the authorities, on Tuesday marked the 100th anniversary of the October Revolution, the uprising led by Vladimir Lenin and his Bolshevik party in 1917, that led to the creation of the Soviet Union and commenced the spread of Communism around the world.

A few thousand people marched through the center of Moscow, carrying large portraits of Lenin and waving red flags, moving toward the Kremlin and Red Square, off which they held a small rally.

It was one of the few major public events commemorating the centenary, which the Kremlin indicated it wants to be low-key. The Bolshevik’s seizure of power was arguably the 20th century’s defining event, fundamentally altering societies around the world and setting up the century’s central clash, the Cold War. But 100 years on, Russia’s current authorities made clear they consider it now peripheral for the country.

“The revolution is modern Russia’s birth certificate, but Russia does not like what it says,” Maksim Trudolyubov, a political commentator wrote in the newspaper, The Moscow Times.

Over the nights 6 and 7 (Oct. 25 and 26 in Russia’s pre-revolutionary calendar) in 1917, soldiers and sailors loyal to the Bolsheviks seized strategic points in Saint Petersburg. Around 2 a.m., they stormed the Winter Palace, the huge ice-green, colonnaded building that stretches along the city’s river. Tsar Nicholas II, whose palace it had been, had already been toppled by an uprising in February. He had been replaced by the so-called Provisional Government, a group of liberal ministers, who had spent the last few months desperately trying to restore order in the country exhausted by World War I.

The Bolsheviks entered the palace from the square. Unlike in later Soviet depictions, they faced almost no resistance — most of the defenders had fled — after it was shelled from the fortress across the river. Coming through the palace’s tunnel-line corridors, they found the Provisional Government holed up in a dining room off the tsar’s former living quarters and arrested them.

The same day, Lenin declared the Bolsheviks now held power. Within months, they would establish a dictatorship and unleash a savage civil war. Rapid progress in education and industrialization would follow, but it was accompanied by bloody repression climaxing under Stalin.

For 70 years, the Soviet Union celebrated Lenin’s seizure of power as an almost religious holiday, with massive parades. His body remains embalmed in state on Red Square. But it has become an inconvenient event for the Kremlin. Engaged in quashing challenges to its own increasingly authoritarian rule, celebrations of revolution are not appealing. At the same time, current President Vladimir Putin has turned to the Soviet Union as the model for his Russia, making it difficult to ignore its founding event.

“It’s puts Putin in a bind,” said Shield Fitzpatrick, a well-known historian of the revolution and professor emerita at the University of Chicago.

The solution has been to say nothing. In December, Putin declared discussion of the revolution should be left to professional historians. Last week he told the Valdai conference, he hoped the centenary can “draw a line under” the divisions provoked by the revolution. Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, told reporters last month the Kremlin saw no reason to mark the occasion. Proposals that Lenin should be removed from Red Square have been dismissed.

Tuesday’s march underlined the Kremlin’s disinterest. The Communists chanted “revolution” as they marched toward the Kremlin, but were channeled tightly between police and wire barriers. Where even a few years ago the march had been allotted Moscow’s main street, now they were squeezed by police onto its pavements. Some of the older Communist marchers rattled the barriers, yelling furiously at police that they had once walked there.

The Kremlin is not alone in its attitude — recent polls show many Russians are deeply ambivalent about the revolution. A poll in October by the Russian Academy of Science showed only 6 percent of Russians feel the revolution is something to be proud of. Some point to the repression that it led to under Stalin, but many seem more troubled by the revolution as a proof of Russia’s weakness at the time.

The result has been muted commemorations, left largely to the Communists, who have hosted a week of events. But even they have often skirted the uprising itself. The party of revolution has grown old too. In Saint Petersburg, it dutifully hosted a conference of “left forces.” At the Tauride Palace, where Lenin established the party, delegations from socialist groups one after another lamented the left’s troubled prospects.

“Maybe Lenin will wake up,” Adrian Larsen Steinboe, a Norwegian delegate, told an ABC News reporter wryly.

Russia’s Communist Party has recently sought to rebrand itself to attract younger members. Part of that involves printing posters showing Marx and Lenin as hipsters. In one, a raffish Lenin in a long red scarf and holding a laptop, looks at the Winter Palace and asks, “Will we take it?” Another shows a picture of a red flag flying over the Kremlin walls with the plaintive date, “201?”

Mostly though, the party has turned toward nostalgia, not for revolutionary upheaval, but for the post-war glory days of the Soviet Union, when many party members were young. At a commemorative concert in Saint Petersburg on Friday, a crowd, mostly in their late sixties, sang along to Soviet-era swing. There were chants of “Lenin lives.” An emcee, also in his sixties, harangued the crowd about the marvels of a first apartment given by the government. “Oh speak of that, speak of that,” he cried, “of the bath!”

Amid the official quiet, Russia’s state media and some cultural institutions have offered hints at how citizens ought to perceive the revolution. Russian state television has aired documentaries suggesting the country’s revolutions were largely foreign-funded plots, a favorite idea of the Kremlin in the present day. Russia 24, the state news channel, ran a program titled “100 Years of the Revolution — A Snare for Russia,” suggesting the 1905 revolution, and by extension 1917, was a conspiracy of American bankers and Japanese generals.

The Kremlin under Putin is a history enthusiast — its avoidance of the revolution itself is notable given how eagerly it makes use of history elsewhere. It has focused recently on building a single continuum of what it considers Russian greatness, from the tsarist empire to the present day, bridged by Stalin.

Putin’s state’s preferred lineage, Trudolyubov said, is Russia’s pre-revolutionary empire. He noted that several of Russia’s key ministries have begun dating their founding to tsarist-era bodies instead of their Soviet forebears.

The now dispossessed Communists who finished Tuesday’s rally put on brave face to ABC News. One man, Aleksey Maksimov, standing in a long gray Stalinist coat and white gloves, and holding a red banner, declaimed, “Communism will not be defeated, it will necessarily come,”he said. “I just can’t tell you which year that will exactly.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Teacher of the Month – November

Posted/updated on: November 27, 2017 at 3:25 am

Lindale ISD – Jennifer King – Lindale High School
Arp ISD – Coach Joe Crawford – Arp High School – Social Studies/Varsity Basketball Coach
Chapel Hill ISD – Amanda Wages – Chapel Hill Middle School
Winona ISD – Rachel Moore – Winona Elementary – 4th Grade Writing
TISD – Oscar Rodriquez – Griffin Elementary

In Focus – 11/5/17 – Melissa Peveto, Junior League of Tyler/Mistletoe and Magic

Posted/updated on: November 6, 2017 at 5:15 am

Airdate: 11/5/17

Guest: Melissa Peveto, Junior League of Tyler/Mistletoe and Magic

Daylight Saving Time 2017 Ends: Turn Clocks Back

Posted/updated on: November 5, 2017 at 3:30 pm

Daylight Saving Time 2017 Ends: Turn Clocks Back – An extra hour of sleep is coming your way as Daylight Saving Time ends, but it also means it gets dark much earlier in the evening. Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 5.… Read the rest of the article…

In Focus – 10/29/17 – Maya Bethany, The 1 in 3 Foundation

Posted/updated on: October 31, 2017 at 5:53 am

Airdate: 10/29/17

Guest: Maya Bethany, The 1 in 3 Foundation

In Focus – 10/22/17 – Dr. Richard Idell, UT Health Northeast, discussing the opioid epidemic

Posted/updated on: October 23, 2017 at 4:14 am

Airdate: 10/22/17

Guest: Dr. Richard Idell, UT Health Northeast, discussing the opioid epidemic

In Focus – 10/15/17 – Kelli Miller, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation

Posted/updated on: October 16, 2017 at 5:11 am

Airdate: 10/15/17

Guest: Kelli Miller, Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation

In Focus – 10/8/17 – Jennifer Blake, Family Circle of Care

Posted/updated on: October 9, 2017 at 4:17 am

Airdate: 10/8/17

Guest: Jennifer Blake, Family Circle of Care

Tim Jones State Farm

Posted/updated on: October 5, 2017 at 9:28 am

Address: 2106 W Gentry Pkwy #101, Tyler, TX 75702
Phone: (903) 593-4114
Website: https://www.statefarm.com/agent/US/TX/Tyler/Tim-Jones-2VMK41YS000

Gray’s Home Fashion Gallery

Posted/updated on: October 5, 2017 at 9:30 am

Address: 2301 S Broadway Ave, Tyler, TX 75701
Phone: (903) 561-1033
Website: http://www.grayshfg.com/
Contact: http://grayshfg.com/contact/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Grays-Home-Fashion-Gallery-438487696241731/
Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/grayshomefashio/

Can Lights Tabbed as Likely Source of Golden Corral Fire

Posted/updated on: October 5, 2017 at 11:41 am

TYLER — The Tyler Fire Department Wednesday morning released information about the source of a Tuesday night fire at Golden Corral on South Broadway. Fire officials say the fire started near the southwest corner of the building in the exterior eve with the only ignition source in the area being can lights. The investigator on scene noted that the breaker controlling the lights had been tripped. It was also noted that an electrician had been out recently working on the lights. Most of the fire damage was to the outside of the building with smoke and light fire damage to the interior. There was also water damage to the inside caused by an activated fire sprinkler system and fire suppression activities. There were no injuries reported and no word on when the eatery might reopen.

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