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Reporter’s notebook: What I learned about my body after being in a metabolic chamber

ABC News/Mara SchiavocampoBy MARA SCHIAVOCAMPO

ABC News’ Mara Schiavocampo shared her experiences after spending a day inside a metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City. Schiavocampo’s journey, which aired on “Good Morning America,” was the first time that TV cameras were allowed to peek into a metabolic chamber, which is used to monitor your total energy expenditure and better understand how your body uses energy in everyday tasks such as resting, eating and exercising.

Three weeks ago I spent an entire day inside a vacuum-sealed metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York; 23-hours trapped inside a room the size of a prison cell. Why? It’s the most cutting edge way to measure how your body burns calories, and just might provide a glimpse into the future of weight management. The room has previously only been available for research purposes, and I’m one of the first people to ever use it commercially.

After analyzing the data for weeks, I finally got the results. As someone who spends a lot of time reading about health and wellness, I wasn’t expecting to learn much. Instead, I was shocked by the results. Here’s what I learned about the way I burn energy:

1. For me, good ole fashioned cardio beats high intensity interval training (HIIT)
High Intensity Interval Training, or HIIT, is one of the hottest new fitness trends. This is a training method where high intensity intervals are followed by brief periods of rest. For example, you might sprint for one minute, then walk for a minute, and repeat this cycle for 30 minutes. It’s widely believed to be one of the most efficient ways of exercising, burning more calories in less time. The chamber found that I burned more calories during a moderate steady run (10.7 per minute) than during a HIIT workout (7 calories per minute). Of course this isn’t a conclusive finding about HIIT’s effectiveness, but it surprised me because I felt like I was working much harder during HIIT.

2. After burn? Not so much
After burn is a phenomenon where your body continues burning calories at an elevated level after you’ve completed a workout. I always thought I was burning higher levels of calories for hours, even days, after an intense workout. Not so much. The chamber found that my body returned to pre-exercise calorie burning levels within 15-minutes of completing my workout. Bummer.

3. Carbs burn fast
The one thing that didn’t surprise me was seeing just how quickly my body burned through carbs. To test this, I spent six hours in a different, smaller chamber, and ate a high carb breakfast of a muffin and sugary coffee drink. My body torched those 750 calories in four hours, compared to the estimated six hours it would have taken to burn off a high-protein meal. This confirmed what most of us know instinctively; protein keeps you full longer.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Free baby boxes welcomed in fight against sleep-related deaths

The Baby Box Company(NEW YORK) — Alabama will give families of all newborns in the state free baby boxes in which to slumber if they take a quiz on sleep safety. The initiative, to start Wednesday, follows New Jersey and Ohio’s campaigns for infant sleep safety with the Baby Box Co.

For Alabama, however, the goal is for the state to combat its higher than usual infant mortality rate, where 8.3 infants die every year out of 1,000 births, compared with the national average of 5.8 infant deaths to 1,000 births, according to officials.

“Alabama is sort of in a crisis situation,” Jennifer Clary, CEO of the Los Angeles-based Baby Box Co., told ABC News while comparing the state’s infant mortality rate to the other two states that have already started using the company’s resources.

About 3,500 infants die every year in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, like Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“If every mother in the state of Alabama used the baby box, it could cut the infant immortality rate by 22 percent,” Suzanne Booth, executive assistant for the Alabama Rural Development Office, told ABC News.

The top three causes of infant deaths in Alabama are malformations at birth, disorders from short pregnancies like low birth weights in premature babies and SIDS, according to Alabama Department of Public Health.

Alabama has set up the resources where parents can watch online videos about SIDS and safe sleep for their newborns through Baby Box University, and take a quiz to qualify for the free box. The families can pick up the boxes at a distribution center or have them mailed to their home address.

The baby box is portable, secure and comes with a firm foam mattress and tight-fitting sheet for safe sleeping. The boxes, which retail for about $70 to $225, also include breast-feeding accessories, onesie, diapers and wipes.

“It feels to me sometimes that I’m doing more for these families by giving them the education, and giving them the box, than by actually being their midwife during labor,” Celina Cunanan, director of the division of nurse-midwifery for University Hospitals/Case Medical Center in Cleveland, told ABC News.

Infant mortality rates among black infants were also three times higher than white infants in Alabama, even though there are nearly double the number of white infant births in 2015, according to the state.

Here are some tips the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends to create a safe sleep environment for an infant:

  • Place the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys. The crib should be bare.
  • Share a bedroom with parents, but not the same sleeping surface, preferably until the baby turns 1 but at least for the first six months. Room-sharing decreases the risk of SIDS by as much as 50 percent.
  • Avoid baby’s exposure to smoke, alcohol and illicit drugs.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Runners help carry fatigued runner to half-marathon finish line

iStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — A trio of runners were caught on camera coming to the aid of a fatigued runner whose legs appeared to buckle within sight of the finish line of a half-marathon in Philadelphia on Sunday.

Video shows the unnamed female runner struggling to hold herself up as she nears the end of the Philadelphia Love Run Half-Marathon.

A fellow runner in a long-sleeved green shirt running on the woman’s right stops and grabs her arm while another male runner on the woman’s left stops and grabs her left arm.

The two men and the woman, who all appear to be strangers, then jog together towards the finish line at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

With dozens of runners passing them by, the two men continue to help the female runner as she becomes more and more unstable and nearly unable to run.

Just steps from the finish line, the woman almost collapses. At that point, a third runner, wearing the same long-sleeved green shirt as one of the first two runners who stopped, halts his finish line sprint and circles back to the female runner.

The third runner then picks the woman up and carries her to the finish line, putting her down just inches from the line so she can finish the race on her own two feet.

The clock above the finish line shows the four runners all finished the race in just over two hours.

Ten-thousand runners completed the race on Sunday, Philadelphia Love Run Half-Marathon race director Michele Redrow told ABC News. Race officials have identified the female runner but have not yet released her name.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Why I chose to document my preventive double mastectomy on social media

ABC NewsBy PAIGE MORE

“Good Morning America” booker and segment producer Paige More shares her personal experience of under going a double mastectomy in her early 20s after she tested positive for a BRCA1 genetic mutation, which greatly increases your risk of developing breast cancer, according to the National Cancer Foundation.

I have always been fearless. I grew up snowboarding, surfing, and cliff diving in southern California. New adventures excite me and nothing stresses me out. I have always believed that no matter what happens in my life, I can handle it.

That all changed when I was 22 years old and tested positive for the BRCA1 genetic mutation. I had just started working as a booker for Good Morning America, when my mom urged me to take the test. I didn’t think much of it as I was busy trying to prove myself at my new dream job. I figured if it would make my mom happy, then I would take the test. I found out a few weeks later that I had tested positive when my doctor called me with my mom on the line. They both told me they were sorry. I still didn’t really understand.

It wasn’t until a few months later when my mom came to visit me in the city that the gravity of the mutation set in. It is so important to make sure you are ready for the results before you get tested. We didn’t understand how much this was going to impact my life. It is so important to be prepared for the results. I was told that I essentially had two options. I could begin intensive surveillance programs, which meant endless visits to the doctor’s office for mammograms, MRIs and blood work. That felt like waiting around to get cancer. My other option was to have a preventative double mastectomy. I left my oncologist’s office feeling overwhelmed and scared of my future for the first time in my life.

I spent the next few months talking with my close friends and family. Everyone was incredibly supportive. But no one told me what to do. I really wanted some guidance either way. Should I have the surgery or should I wait until I was older? What if cancer struck while I was waiting? What was I waiting for?

I was never a worrier or an anxious person and I worried about getting cancer every single day. Every time I tried on a new top, took a shower, or looked in the mirror I thought, “I am going to get breast cancer.” It was so overwhelming I realized I couldn’t live in constant fear anymore.

Fortunately, I was in a great place in my life and I felt like I was ready to have a preventative double mastectomy. My friends, family, and boyfriend were incredibly supportive. I had a stable and steady job. I was healthy and fit. I knew I didn’t want to worry and I knew that I would most likely have to do this someday anyway. I was ready now. I wanted to do everything in my power to be a “Previvor,” not a survivor.

A previvor is someone who is a survivor of a predisposition to cancer but who hasn’t had the disease. This group includes people who carry a hereditary mutation, a family history of cancer, or some other predisposing factor.

In October, we set my surgery date for January 3. I had 90 days to really prepare. I asked my doctors if I should do anything to better prep myself for surgery. They said no. I didn’t listen. I joined the gym across from my office and started working out regularly. I ate as healthfully as I could. I made sure I was in the best shape of my life for January 3.

Walking into surgery was one of the strangest experiences in my life. I wanted to turn and run away, but I knew I had to face this head on, like I do with everything else in my life. After a few hours my doctors came out to tell my parents that the surgery had gone incredibly well, in part because my muscles were so strong and I was so healthy. I am so thankful I chose to be proactive and make sure my body was as strong as possible before my surgery. It gave me something other than the surgery to focus on and gave me a sense of power that I had control back over my body. Having a strong core and legs helped me so much during my recovery.

I never intended to share my story. Before my surgery, I looked up double mastectomies online and only saw horror stories and worst-case scenarios. I read how women no longer felt feminine or struggled with their body image after having their breasts removed. I was terrified of feeling the same way. I felt like I had no one to talk to. I felt completely alone. After my surgery I flew home to California to recover and to be close by my family.

While I was home, my little sister who is 13 and loves Instagram, wanted to take some photos of me. I didn’t really want to because I expected to be disappointed by what I looked like. But my little sister hasn’t been tested for the genetic mutation yet and I wanted her to see that I was still the same big sister and that my surgery hadn’t changed me. I also didn’t want her to be scared about getting tested for the genetic mutation in the future.

When she showed me the photos she took I couldn’t believe how much I loved them and how I looked. I couldn’t believe how beautiful I felt. I actually felt sexier than I have ever felt in my life because I knew I took control of my body and potentially saved my own life. That made me feel so empowered and strong. My scars reminded me of this decision and made me feel beautiful. So we continued taking photos and I began posting them to my personal social media accounts.

The response was incredible. People were so supportive. Women from all over the world were reaching out to me, thanking me for sharing and being so open. I felt like I couldn’t stop. I wanted people to know that you can have a double mastectomy and it doesn’t have to ruin your life. Not only was I happy, I was no longer worrying about the risk of getting breast cancer.

As I continued to post, I started connecting with more and more women. I quickly realized I needed a separate space to post about my experience. I created an Instagram, @paige_previvor, so women going through similar situations would be able to reach me.

Through sharing my story on Instagram I quickly realized that there are a ton of other women who feel similarly to me. I felt compelled to do everything in my power to prevent other young women like me from feeling alone. Through Instagram I have formed a community of young women who have been affected by breast cancer in some capacity.

Rather than having to sit in a stuffy support group meeting, I have started setting up events around the city where we can get together in a comfortable and fun environment — I call them my breast friends! I hope to give them a platform to share their stories and find a way to help women all over the world connect with each other through Our Move Movement.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

‘Beauty and the Beast’ star Audra McDonald opens up about having a baby at 46

Brad Barket/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — It’s been 16 years since Audra McDonald had a baby.

Now at age 46, the “Beauty and the Beast” star has a second baby and a first with her husband and fellow Broadway star Will Swenson.

The couple welcomed daughter Sally James last October.

McDonald said she has changed as a mother since the first time around.

“I’m calmer this time around, 16 years later,” she told People magazine. “Or maybe it’s that I’m just tired because I’m older, but I don’t sweat the small stuff as much.”

And although Sally James is only 5 months old, she already has a larger-than-life personality, her mother said.

“In some ways, I don’t worry about her — this is a very strong personality, I’m seeing it already!” she said. “This is someone who’s not gonna let anybody walk over her at all. In fact, she’ll be the one doing the walking.”

When the six-time Tony Award winner announced her pregnancy, she said it was unexpected.

“Who knew that tap dancing during perimenopause could lead 2 pregnancy? @thewillswenson & I are completely surprised but elated 2 b expecting,” she wrote on Twitter last May.

McDonald, who formerly starred on the ABC series “Private Practice,” also has a daughter, Zoe, from a previous marriage, and Swenson has two sons with his former wife.

“Zoe is such a fantastic big sister to Sally James,” McDonald said of her older daughter. “That’s just who she wants to hang out with. Every time Zoe walks into the room, Sally lights up. And that’s so important to me.”

“Zoe is a rock star as far as Sally James is concerned,” she added. “If you wanna make me melt, just put my two daughters together, and I’m a puddle.”

McDonald and Swenson, 43, married in 2012 at their home in Croton-on-Hudson, New York.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Cops in standoff after fatal Las Vegas bus shooting

iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — One person is dead and another wounded after a shooting on a bus in Las Vegas, but the suspect remained barricaded inside in a tense standoff, police said.

The armed suspect is currently alone on the bus, and police are working to get him into custody, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police said.

Police said it is unknown what provoked the shooting, but there was no evidence to suggest that the incident was related to a robbery overnight at Bellagio Resort & Casino overnight.

According to a tweet from the LVMPD, part of the Las Vegas Strip has been shut down after the gunman barricaded himself inside a bus. The area that was shut down, between Flamingo and Harmon streets, is where several large hotels are, including Planet Hollywood, Bellagio and the Cosmopolitan.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Bill Murray cheers on Xavier basketball team’s upset win over Arizona

ABC/Randy Holmes(NEW YORK) — Bill Murray was seen cheering on No. 11-seed Xavier University in the team’s victory over No. 2-seed University of Arizona in Thursday’s NCAA tournament matchup.

Murray’s son Luke Murray is in his second year as an assistant coach for Xavier’s basketball team.

When the team pulled off the shocking 73-71 win over Arizona, Murray went crazy in the stands, high-fiving those around him and rubbing the head of Sister Rose Ann Fleming, the now-famous 77-year-old nun who makes sure all of Xavier’s student-athletes meet the school’s academic standards.

Murray, 66, hasn’t missed a single tournament game, which has some suggesting he could be behind the team’s winning streak.

“Tons of credit to Bill Murray,” Entourage actor Jerry Ferrara tweeted after the win.

Murray is having a stellar sports year. Not only is his son’s team on a roll, but last year, his favorite major league baseball team, the Chicago Cubs, clinched the World Series title for the first time in 108 years.

You can bet the actor will be in the stands when Xavier takes on No. 1-seed Gonzaga on Saturday for a chance to go to the Final Four.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Julianne Hough wants to start ‘open conversations’ about endomitriosis

ABC/Eric McCandless(NEW YORK) — Julianne Hough hopes being vocal about her struggle with endometriosis will help more women feel comfortable talking about their own experiences. In an interview with People, she talked about her diagnosis.

“When I was 15, I had symptoms of endometriosis, but I had never heard of it, didn’t know what it was,” she said. “I thought that this was just the kind of pain you have when you’re on your period. For years, I was just thinking that it was normal and never really talked about it.”

After being rushed to the hospital in 2008, she found out about her condition and soon had surgery.

“The first initial thought was a little bit of fear because I didn’t know what it was, especially because it’s not talked about as much as it is today,” Hough said. “And then also relief because I was able to put a name to the pain, and know there were treatments and I could talk to my doctor and create a plan to help manage the pain.”

She’s now working with a campaign to raise awareness of endometriosis. She said it’s about starting an open conversation about symptoms.

“I don’t care about being private about this anymore because I really want the women that are going through debilitating pain to benefit from my story or this campaign,” the Dancing With the Stars judge said.

She’s made some adjustments since her diagnosis — she slows down when she needs to, and takes days off when necessary, but said she still leads an active, healthy lifestyle. Her fiancé, Brooks Laich, has been a source of support, Hough said.

“He’s amazing,” she said. “The first time he found out about it was because I was having an episode, and I couldn’t even speak. As soon as it passed, I was able to tell him what it was. Now he knows when I’m having a little episode, and just rubs my back and is there for me and supports me. There’s comfort in knowing that the people around me get it and understand, so I don’t feel like I have to push through the pain because I don’t want to look weak.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

House set to vote on GOP health care bill Friday

tupungato/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The House will vote on the Republican-backed American Health Care Act (AHCA) Friday after Thursday night’s planned House vote was delayed.

President Donald Trump’s top advisers told House Republicans in a meeting on the Hill Thursday evening that the president felt the time had come for a vote on the AHCA — and that it should happen
Friday.

Sources in the room told ABC News Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney delivered President Trump’s call for an up-or-down vote on Friday, regardless of where the vote count
stands.

“That’s what POTUS wants,” one attendee told ABC News.

“We have to have a vote tomorrow. He expects it to pass. But he’s moving on if for some reason it didn’t,” Rep. Chris Collins, R-New York, told reporters.

Senior Trump aides Steve Bannon, Reince Priebus and Kellyanne Conway were in the room but did not speak during the session, sources said.

On his way into the meeting, Priebus told ABC News he’s “feeling good” about things. “Still feeling positive. A lot of work to do,” he said.

While sources said White House officials didn’t rule out further negotiations or changes to the bill, they made clear the time has come to put the conference on record.

House Freedom Caucus leader Rep. Mark Meadows, R-North Carolina, who has led opposition to the plan and has been courted personally by the president, was not in attendance. He told reporters
outside the meeting that he wants to keep dealmaking and was said to be trying to arrange direct talks between his group and the more moderate “Tuesday Group” later this evening.

The AHCA vote was postponed this afternoon as the party struggled to collect the votes needed to ensure its passage.

But the White House said it is “confident” the bill will pass Friday. “Debate will commence tonight as planned and the vote will be in the morning to avoid voting at 3 a.m.,” White House deputy
press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. “We feel this should be done in the light of day, not in the wee hours of the night and we are confident the bill will pass in the morning.”

President Trump had made his last-minute sales pitch to conservative House Freedom Caucus members at the White House earlier in the day. After the meeting, however, caucus members said they hadn’t
reached a point where they could support the AHCA in its current form.

The president and caucus members discussed options and were “trying to get creative,” Meadows told ABC News.

“We are certainly trying to get to yes,” Meadows told reporters on the Hill today before the vote postponement. “But, indeed, we’ve made very reasonable requests and we are hopeful that those
reasonable requests will be listened to and, ultimately, agreed to.”

Spicer had earlier called the meeting a “positive step” and said the White House was “very, very pleased with the direction” of the negotiations.

He also dismissed characterizations of the meeting as attempts to strike a deal.

“I think some of them stood up and said, ‘Mr. President, we’re with you.’ I think a lot of them said, ‘We’re going to go back and think about it.’ The meeting didn’t conclude by saying, ‘Do we have
a deal?’ That’s not why we have it,” Spicer said. “This was a discussion that the president continues to have.”

Some House Republicans have grown frustrated with the demands of their colleagues in the Freedom Caucus.

“Two groups that don’t represent even the majority of the Republican conference have been given every opportunity to have multiple conversations with the president and the leadership,” Rep. Bradley
Byrne, R-Alabama, said. “At some point, you’ve got to say, ‘That’s it.’ And we’re at that point.”

Despite Wednesday’s late-night negotiations and personal pitches from President Trump, the list of “no” votes against the AHCA appeared to still stand.

At least 32 Republicans had said they would oppose the bill, according to ABC News’ latest whip count. The GOP needs 216 votes for a simple majority to pass the bill in the House, so they can
afford to lose 21 votes for passage.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

New poll finds dipping approval, honesty ratings for Trump

SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A public opinion poll released by Quinnipiac University Wednesday reported decreasing levels of approval for President Donald Trump in the midst of his battle over the new health
care bill, continued insistence he was surveilled and a probe into Russian interference during the presidential election.

Trump’s approval rating fell slightly to 37 percent in the poll, compared to 41 percent just over two weeks ago when Quinnipiac released its March 7 results. Respondents disapprove of the president
at a 56 percent rate in the Quinnipiac numbers, up slightly from 52 percent on March 7. The poll’s margin of error is +/- 3 percent among registered voters.

Members of Trump’s own political party voiced increasing levels of displeasure with his performance. Among Republicans, Trump’s approval rating dropped 10 points from 91 to 81 percent and levels of
disapproval almost tripled from 5 percent to 14 percent. Democratic disapproval of Trump’s performance sits at 90 percent, with just 6 percent of party members reporting approval.

Perception of Trump’s honesty and leadership skills were among the personal qualities gauged by the poll. Of those answering, 35 percent said Trump was honest, down slightly from 39 percent earlier
in the month and a high of 42 percent on February 7.

Those who responded that the president is a good leader is down to 40 percent — the same amount who said he “cares about average Americans — from 47 percent two weeks ago and a high of 56 percent
just after the election on November 22.

One of Trump’s lowest numbers came in the number of poll respondents who said he was “level-headed:” 30 percent.

The president performed better with questions about strength (66 percent of those polled said he was a strong person) and intelligence (59 percent said that he possessed the quality.)

As for one of the White House’s most controversial stances, 19 percent of those polled believe that “President Obama wiretapped Trump Tower during the 2016 presidential election,” compared to 70
percent who do not believe the claim. Republicans are virtually even by a 41-39 margin.

Congress’ approval rating sits lower than Trump’s with House Republicans at 29 percent and House Democrats at 30 percent.

Respondents were split on Trump’s battle with the media — each received support at a 34 percent level when those polled were asked, separately, if each can be trusted “to do what is right almost
all of the time or most of the time.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sheriff: Do Abuse Allegations against La. Man Span 5 States?

CHALMETTE, La. (AP) – Authorities want to know if a man accused of abusing a girl in a New Orleans suburb in the early 2000s may have had more recent victims in other states, including Texas. St. Bernard Parish Sheriff James Pohlmann says 54-year-old Timothy Gemelli of Slidell has been arrested on a charge of sexually abusing a girl below the age of 10 in Chalmette. He’s being held in lieu of $400,000 bond. Pohlmann says Gemelli also has lived in Longmont and Firestone, Colorado; Chicopee, Massachusetts; Picayune, Mississippi; and Harris County, Texas. Detectives want to know about possible victims in those areas. At the time of the alleged abuse, Gemelli lived in Chalmette. Sheriff’s spokesman Steve Cannizaro said Thursday that Gemelli does not yet have an attorney who could comment about the allegation.

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Reporter’s notebook: What I learned about my body after being in a metabolic chamber

Posted/updated on: March 28, 2017 at 8:13 am

ABC News/Mara SchiavocampoBy MARA SCHIAVOCAMPO

ABC News’ Mara Schiavocampo shared her experiences after spending a day inside a metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York City. Schiavocampo’s journey, which aired on “Good Morning America,” was the first time that TV cameras were allowed to peek into a metabolic chamber, which is used to monitor your total energy expenditure and better understand how your body uses energy in everyday tasks such as resting, eating and exercising.

Three weeks ago I spent an entire day inside a vacuum-sealed metabolic chamber at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York; 23-hours trapped inside a room the size of a prison cell. Why? It’s the most cutting edge way to measure how your body burns calories, and just might provide a glimpse into the future of weight management. The room has previously only been available for research purposes, and I’m one of the first people to ever use it commercially.

After analyzing the data for weeks, I finally got the results. As someone who spends a lot of time reading about health and wellness, I wasn’t expecting to learn much. Instead, I was shocked by the results. Here’s what I learned about the way I burn energy:

1. For me, good ole fashioned cardio beats high intensity interval training (HIIT)
High Intensity Interval Training, or HIIT, is one of the hottest new fitness trends. This is a training method where high intensity intervals are followed by brief periods of rest. For example, you might sprint for one minute, then walk for a minute, and repeat this cycle for 30 minutes. It’s widely believed to be one of the most efficient ways of exercising, burning more calories in less time. The chamber found that I burned more calories during a moderate steady run (10.7 per minute) than during a HIIT workout (7 calories per minute). Of course this isn’t a conclusive finding about HIIT’s effectiveness, but it surprised me because I felt like I was working much harder during HIIT.

2. After burn? Not so much
After burn is a phenomenon where your body continues burning calories at an elevated level after you’ve completed a workout. I always thought I was burning higher levels of calories for hours, even days, after an intense workout. Not so much. The chamber found that my body returned to pre-exercise calorie burning levels within 15-minutes of completing my workout. Bummer.

3. Carbs burn fast
The one thing that didn’t surprise me was seeing just how quickly my body burned through carbs. To test this, I spent six hours in a different, smaller chamber, and ate a high carb breakfast of a muffin and sugary coffee drink. My body torched those 750 calories in four hours, compared to the estimated six hours it would have taken to burn off a high-protein meal. This confirmed what most of us know instinctively; protein keeps you full longer.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Free baby boxes welcomed in fight against sleep-related deaths

Posted/updated on: March 27, 2017 at 11:19 pm

The Baby Box Company(NEW YORK) — Alabama will give families of all newborns in the state free baby boxes in which to slumber if they take a quiz on sleep safety. The initiative, to start Wednesday, follows New Jersey and Ohio’s campaigns for infant sleep safety with the Baby Box Co.

For Alabama, however, the goal is for the state to combat its higher than usual infant mortality rate, where 8.3 infants die every year out of 1,000 births, compared with the national average of 5.8 infant deaths to 1,000 births, according to officials.

“Alabama is sort of in a crisis situation,” Jennifer Clary, CEO of the Los Angeles-based Baby Box Co., told ABC News while comparing the state’s infant mortality rate to the other two states that have already started using the company’s resources.

About 3,500 infants die every year in the United States from sleep-related infant deaths, like Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), according to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

“If every mother in the state of Alabama used the baby box, it could cut the infant immortality rate by 22 percent,” Suzanne Booth, executive assistant for the Alabama Rural Development Office, told ABC News.

The top three causes of infant deaths in Alabama are malformations at birth, disorders from short pregnancies like low birth weights in premature babies and SIDS, according to Alabama Department of Public Health.

Alabama has set up the resources where parents can watch online videos about SIDS and safe sleep for their newborns through Baby Box University, and take a quiz to qualify for the free box. The families can pick up the boxes at a distribution center or have them mailed to their home address.

The baby box is portable, secure and comes with a firm foam mattress and tight-fitting sheet for safe sleeping. The boxes, which retail for about $70 to $225, also include breast-feeding accessories, onesie, diapers and wipes.

“It feels to me sometimes that I’m doing more for these families by giving them the education, and giving them the box, than by actually being their midwife during labor,” Celina Cunanan, director of the division of nurse-midwifery for University Hospitals/Case Medical Center in Cleveland, told ABC News.

Infant mortality rates among black infants were also three times higher than white infants in Alabama, even though there are nearly double the number of white infant births in 2015, according to the state.

Here are some tips the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends to create a safe sleep environment for an infant:

  • Place the baby on his or her back on a firm sleep surface such as a crib or bassinet with a tight-fitting sheet.
  • Avoid use of soft bedding, including crib bumpers, blankets, pillows and soft toys. The crib should be bare.
  • Share a bedroom with parents, but not the same sleeping surface, preferably until the baby turns 1 but at least for the first six months. Room-sharing decreases the risk of SIDS by as much as 50 percent.
  • Avoid baby’s exposure to smoke, alcohol and illicit drugs.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Runners help carry fatigued runner to half-marathon finish line

Posted/updated on: March 27, 2017 at 12:00 pm

iStock/Thinkstock(PHILADELPHIA) — A trio of runners were caught on camera coming to the aid of a fatigued runner whose legs appeared to buckle within sight of the finish line of a half-marathon in Philadelphia on Sunday.

Video shows the unnamed female runner struggling to hold herself up as she nears the end of the Philadelphia Love Run Half-Marathon.

A fellow runner in a long-sleeved green shirt running on the woman’s right stops and grabs her arm while another male runner on the woman’s left stops and grabs her left arm.

The two men and the woman, who all appear to be strangers, then jog together towards the finish line at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

With dozens of runners passing them by, the two men continue to help the female runner as she becomes more and more unstable and nearly unable to run.

Just steps from the finish line, the woman almost collapses. At that point, a third runner, wearing the same long-sleeved green shirt as one of the first two runners who stopped, halts his finish line sprint and circles back to the female runner.

The third runner then picks the woman up and carries her to the finish line, putting her down just inches from the line so she can finish the race on her own two feet.

The clock above the finish line shows the four runners all finished the race in just over two hours.

Ten-thousand runners completed the race on Sunday, Philadelphia Love Run Half-Marathon race director Michele Redrow told ABC News. Race officials have identified the female runner but have not yet released her name.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Why I chose to document my preventive double mastectomy on social media

Posted/updated on: March 27, 2017 at 12:01 pm

ABC NewsBy PAIGE MORE

“Good Morning America” booker and segment producer Paige More shares her personal experience of under going a double mastectomy in her early 20s after she tested positive for a BRCA1 genetic mutation, which greatly increases your risk of developing breast cancer, according to the National Cancer Foundation.

I have always been fearless. I grew up snowboarding, surfing, and cliff diving in southern California. New adventures excite me and nothing stresses me out. I have always believed that no matter what happens in my life, I can handle it.

That all changed when I was 22 years old and tested positive for the BRCA1 genetic mutation. I had just started working as a booker for Good Morning America, when my mom urged me to take the test. I didn’t think much of it as I was busy trying to prove myself at my new dream job. I figured if it would make my mom happy, then I would take the test. I found out a few weeks later that I had tested positive when my doctor called me with my mom on the line. They both told me they were sorry. I still didn’t really understand.

It wasn’t until a few months later when my mom came to visit me in the city that the gravity of the mutation set in. It is so important to make sure you are ready for the results before you get tested. We didn’t understand how much this was going to impact my life. It is so important to be prepared for the results. I was told that I essentially had two options. I could begin intensive surveillance programs, which meant endless visits to the doctor’s office for mammograms, MRIs and blood work. That felt like waiting around to get cancer. My other option was to have a preventative double mastectomy. I left my oncologist’s office feeling overwhelmed and scared of my future for the first time in my life.

I spent the next few months talking with my close friends and family. Everyone was incredibly supportive. But no one told me what to do. I really wanted some guidance either way. Should I have the surgery or should I wait until I was older? What if cancer struck while I was waiting? What was I waiting for?

I was never a worrier or an anxious person and I worried about getting cancer every single day. Every time I tried on a new top, took a shower, or looked in the mirror I thought, “I am going to get breast cancer.” It was so overwhelming I realized I couldn’t live in constant fear anymore.

Fortunately, I was in a great place in my life and I felt like I was ready to have a preventative double mastectomy. My friends, family, and boyfriend were incredibly supportive. I had a stable and steady job. I was healthy and fit. I knew I didn’t want to worry and I knew that I would most likely have to do this someday anyway. I was ready now. I wanted to do everything in my power to be a “Previvor,” not a survivor.

A previvor is someone who is a survivor of a predisposition to cancer but who hasn’t had the disease. This group includes people who carry a hereditary mutation, a family history of cancer, or some other predisposing factor.

In October, we set my surgery date for January 3. I had 90 days to really prepare. I asked my doctors if I should do anything to better prep myself for surgery. They said no. I didn’t listen. I joined the gym across from my office and started working out regularly. I ate as healthfully as I could. I made sure I was in the best shape of my life for January 3.

Walking into surgery was one of the strangest experiences in my life. I wanted to turn and run away, but I knew I had to face this head on, like I do with everything else in my life. After a few hours my doctors came out to tell my parents that the surgery had gone incredibly well, in part because my muscles were so strong and I was so healthy. I am so thankful I chose to be proactive and make sure my body was as strong as possible before my surgery. It gave me something other than the surgery to focus on and gave me a sense of power that I had control back over my body. Having a strong core and legs helped me so much during my recovery.

I never intended to share my story. Before my surgery, I looked up double mastectomies online and only saw horror stories and worst-case scenarios. I read how women no longer felt feminine or struggled with their body image after having their breasts removed. I was terrified of feeling the same way. I felt like I had no one to talk to. I felt completely alone. After my surgery I flew home to California to recover and to be close by my family.

While I was home, my little sister who is 13 and loves Instagram, wanted to take some photos of me. I didn’t really want to because I expected to be disappointed by what I looked like. But my little sister hasn’t been tested for the genetic mutation yet and I wanted her to see that I was still the same big sister and that my surgery hadn’t changed me. I also didn’t want her to be scared about getting tested for the genetic mutation in the future.

When she showed me the photos she took I couldn’t believe how much I loved them and how I looked. I couldn’t believe how beautiful I felt. I actually felt sexier than I have ever felt in my life because I knew I took control of my body and potentially saved my own life. That made me feel so empowered and strong. My scars reminded me of this decision and made me feel beautiful. So we continued taking photos and I began posting them to my personal social media accounts.

The response was incredible. People were so supportive. Women from all over the world were reaching out to me, thanking me for sharing and being so open. I felt like I couldn’t stop. I wanted people to know that you can have a double mastectomy and it doesn’t have to ruin your life. Not only was I happy, I was no longer worrying about the risk of getting breast cancer.

As I continued to post, I started connecting with more and more women. I quickly realized I needed a separate space to post about my experience. I created an Instagram, @paige_previvor, so women going through similar situations would be able to reach me.

Through sharing my story on Instagram I quickly realized that there are a ton of other women who feel similarly to me. I felt compelled to do everything in my power to prevent other young women like me from feeling alone. Through Instagram I have formed a community of young women who have been affected by breast cancer in some capacity.

Rather than having to sit in a stuffy support group meeting, I have started setting up events around the city where we can get together in a comfortable and fun environment — I call them my breast friends! I hope to give them a platform to share their stories and find a way to help women all over the world connect with each other through Our Move Movement.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

‘Beauty and the Beast’ star Audra McDonald opens up about having a baby at 46

Posted/updated on: March 26, 2017 at 5:03 am

Brad Barket/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — It’s been 16 years since Audra McDonald had a baby.

Now at age 46, the “Beauty and the Beast” star has a second baby and a first with her husband and fellow Broadway star Will Swenson.

The couple welcomed daughter Sally James last October.

McDonald said she has changed as a mother since the first time around.

“I’m calmer this time around, 16 years later,” she told People magazine. “Or maybe it’s that I’m just tired because I’m older, but I don’t sweat the small stuff as much.”

And although Sally James is only 5 months old, she already has a larger-than-life personality, her mother said.

“In some ways, I don’t worry about her — this is a very strong personality, I’m seeing it already!” she said. “This is someone who’s not gonna let anybody walk over her at all. In fact, she’ll be the one doing the walking.”

When the six-time Tony Award winner announced her pregnancy, she said it was unexpected.

“Who knew that tap dancing during perimenopause could lead 2 pregnancy? @thewillswenson & I are completely surprised but elated 2 b expecting,” she wrote on Twitter last May.

McDonald, who formerly starred on the ABC series “Private Practice,” also has a daughter, Zoe, from a previous marriage, and Swenson has two sons with his former wife.

“Zoe is such a fantastic big sister to Sally James,” McDonald said of her older daughter. “That’s just who she wants to hang out with. Every time Zoe walks into the room, Sally lights up. And that’s so important to me.”

“Zoe is a rock star as far as Sally James is concerned,” she added. “If you wanna make me melt, just put my two daughters together, and I’m a puddle.”

McDonald and Swenson, 43, married in 2012 at their home in Croton-on-Hudson, New York.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Cops in standoff after fatal Las Vegas bus shooting

Posted/updated on: March 25, 2017 at 7:22 pm

iStock/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — One person is dead and another wounded after a shooting on a bus in Las Vegas, but the suspect remained barricaded inside in a tense standoff, police said.

The armed suspect is currently alone on the bus, and police are working to get him into custody, the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police said.

Police said it is unknown what provoked the shooting, but there was no evidence to suggest that the incident was related to a robbery overnight at Bellagio Resort & Casino overnight.

According to a tweet from the LVMPD, part of the Las Vegas Strip has been shut down after the gunman barricaded himself inside a bus. The area that was shut down, between Flamingo and Harmon streets, is where several large hotels are, including Planet Hollywood, Bellagio and the Cosmopolitan.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Bill Murray cheers on Xavier basketball team’s upset win over Arizona

Posted/updated on: March 24, 2017 at 12:41 pm

ABC/Randy Holmes(NEW YORK) — Bill Murray was seen cheering on No. 11-seed Xavier University in the team’s victory over No. 2-seed University of Arizona in Thursday’s NCAA tournament matchup.

Murray’s son Luke Murray is in his second year as an assistant coach for Xavier’s basketball team.

When the team pulled off the shocking 73-71 win over Arizona, Murray went crazy in the stands, high-fiving those around him and rubbing the head of Sister Rose Ann Fleming, the now-famous 77-year-old nun who makes sure all of Xavier’s student-athletes meet the school’s academic standards.

Murray, 66, hasn’t missed a single tournament game, which has some suggesting he could be behind the team’s winning streak.

“Tons of credit to Bill Murray,” Entourage actor Jerry Ferrara tweeted after the win.

Murray is having a stellar sports year. Not only is his son’s team on a roll, but last year, his favorite major league baseball team, the Chicago Cubs, clinched the World Series title for the first time in 108 years.

You can bet the actor will be in the stands when Xavier takes on No. 1-seed Gonzaga on Saturday for a chance to go to the Final Four.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Julianne Hough wants to start ‘open conversations’ about endomitriosis

Posted/updated on: March 24, 2017 at 12:41 pm

ABC/Eric McCandless(NEW YORK) — Julianne Hough hopes being vocal about her struggle with endometriosis will help more women feel comfortable talking about their own experiences. In an interview with People, she talked about her diagnosis.

“When I was 15, I had symptoms of endometriosis, but I had never heard of it, didn’t know what it was,” she said. “I thought that this was just the kind of pain you have when you’re on your period. For years, I was just thinking that it was normal and never really talked about it.”

After being rushed to the hospital in 2008, she found out about her condition and soon had surgery.

“The first initial thought was a little bit of fear because I didn’t know what it was, especially because it’s not talked about as much as it is today,” Hough said. “And then also relief because I was able to put a name to the pain, and know there were treatments and I could talk to my doctor and create a plan to help manage the pain.”

She’s now working with a campaign to raise awareness of endometriosis. She said it’s about starting an open conversation about symptoms.

“I don’t care about being private about this anymore because I really want the women that are going through debilitating pain to benefit from my story or this campaign,” the Dancing With the Stars judge said.

She’s made some adjustments since her diagnosis — she slows down when she needs to, and takes days off when necessary, but said she still leads an active, healthy lifestyle. Her fiancé, Brooks Laich, has been a source of support, Hough said.

“He’s amazing,” she said. “The first time he found out about it was because I was having an episode, and I couldn’t even speak. As soon as it passed, I was able to tell him what it was. Now he knows when I’m having a little episode, and just rubs my back and is there for me and supports me. There’s comfort in knowing that the people around me get it and understand, so I don’t feel like I have to push through the pain because I don’t want to look weak.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

House set to vote on GOP health care bill Friday

Posted/updated on: March 23, 2017 at 11:17 pm

tupungato/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — The House will vote on the Republican-backed American Health Care Act (AHCA) Friday after Thursday night’s planned House vote was delayed.

President Donald Trump’s top advisers told House Republicans in a meeting on the Hill Thursday evening that the president felt the time had come for a vote on the AHCA — and that it should happen
Friday.

Sources in the room told ABC News Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney delivered President Trump’s call for an up-or-down vote on Friday, regardless of where the vote count
stands.

“That’s what POTUS wants,” one attendee told ABC News.

“We have to have a vote tomorrow. He expects it to pass. But he’s moving on if for some reason it didn’t,” Rep. Chris Collins, R-New York, told reporters.

Senior Trump aides Steve Bannon, Reince Priebus and Kellyanne Conway were in the room but did not speak during the session, sources said.

On his way into the meeting, Priebus told ABC News he’s “feeling good” about things. “Still feeling positive. A lot of work to do,” he said.

While sources said White House officials didn’t rule out further negotiations or changes to the bill, they made clear the time has come to put the conference on record.

House Freedom Caucus leader Rep. Mark Meadows, R-North Carolina, who has led opposition to the plan and has been courted personally by the president, was not in attendance. He told reporters
outside the meeting that he wants to keep dealmaking and was said to be trying to arrange direct talks between his group and the more moderate “Tuesday Group” later this evening.

The AHCA vote was postponed this afternoon as the party struggled to collect the votes needed to ensure its passage.

But the White House said it is “confident” the bill will pass Friday. “Debate will commence tonight as planned and the vote will be in the morning to avoid voting at 3 a.m.,” White House deputy
press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said. “We feel this should be done in the light of day, not in the wee hours of the night and we are confident the bill will pass in the morning.”

President Trump had made his last-minute sales pitch to conservative House Freedom Caucus members at the White House earlier in the day. After the meeting, however, caucus members said they hadn’t
reached a point where they could support the AHCA in its current form.

The president and caucus members discussed options and were “trying to get creative,” Meadows told ABC News.

“We are certainly trying to get to yes,” Meadows told reporters on the Hill today before the vote postponement. “But, indeed, we’ve made very reasonable requests and we are hopeful that those
reasonable requests will be listened to and, ultimately, agreed to.”

Spicer had earlier called the meeting a “positive step” and said the White House was “very, very pleased with the direction” of the negotiations.

He also dismissed characterizations of the meeting as attempts to strike a deal.

“I think some of them stood up and said, ‘Mr. President, we’re with you.’ I think a lot of them said, ‘We’re going to go back and think about it.’ The meeting didn’t conclude by saying, ‘Do we have
a deal?’ That’s not why we have it,” Spicer said. “This was a discussion that the president continues to have.”

Some House Republicans have grown frustrated with the demands of their colleagues in the Freedom Caucus.

“Two groups that don’t represent even the majority of the Republican conference have been given every opportunity to have multiple conversations with the president and the leadership,” Rep. Bradley
Byrne, R-Alabama, said. “At some point, you’ve got to say, ‘That’s it.’ And we’re at that point.”

Despite Wednesday’s late-night negotiations and personal pitches from President Trump, the list of “no” votes against the AHCA appeared to still stand.

At least 32 Republicans had said they would oppose the bill, according to ABC News’ latest whip count. The GOP needs 216 votes for a simple majority to pass the bill in the House, so they can
afford to lose 21 votes for passage.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

New poll finds dipping approval, honesty ratings for Trump

Posted/updated on: March 22, 2017 at 11:25 pm

SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) — A public opinion poll released by Quinnipiac University Wednesday reported decreasing levels of approval for President Donald Trump in the midst of his battle over the new health
care bill, continued insistence he was surveilled and a probe into Russian interference during the presidential election.

Trump’s approval rating fell slightly to 37 percent in the poll, compared to 41 percent just over two weeks ago when Quinnipiac released its March 7 results. Respondents disapprove of the president
at a 56 percent rate in the Quinnipiac numbers, up slightly from 52 percent on March 7. The poll’s margin of error is +/- 3 percent among registered voters.

Members of Trump’s own political party voiced increasing levels of displeasure with his performance. Among Republicans, Trump’s approval rating dropped 10 points from 91 to 81 percent and levels of
disapproval almost tripled from 5 percent to 14 percent. Democratic disapproval of Trump’s performance sits at 90 percent, with just 6 percent of party members reporting approval.

Perception of Trump’s honesty and leadership skills were among the personal qualities gauged by the poll. Of those answering, 35 percent said Trump was honest, down slightly from 39 percent earlier
in the month and a high of 42 percent on February 7.

Those who responded that the president is a good leader is down to 40 percent — the same amount who said he “cares about average Americans — from 47 percent two weeks ago and a high of 56 percent
just after the election on November 22.

One of Trump’s lowest numbers came in the number of poll respondents who said he was “level-headed:” 30 percent.

The president performed better with questions about strength (66 percent of those polled said he was a strong person) and intelligence (59 percent said that he possessed the quality.)

As for one of the White House’s most controversial stances, 19 percent of those polled believe that “President Obama wiretapped Trump Tower during the 2016 presidential election,” compared to 70
percent who do not believe the claim. Republicans are virtually even by a 41-39 margin.

Congress’ approval rating sits lower than Trump’s with House Republicans at 29 percent and House Democrats at 30 percent.

Respondents were split on Trump’s battle with the media — each received support at a 34 percent level when those polled were asked, separately, if each can be trusted “to do what is right almost
all of the time or most of the time.”

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Sheriff: Do Abuse Allegations against La. Man Span 5 States?

Posted/updated on: January 19, 2017 at 4:35 pm

CHALMETTE, La. (AP) – Authorities want to know if a man accused of abusing a girl in a New Orleans suburb in the early 2000s may have had more recent victims in other states, including Texas. St. Bernard Parish Sheriff James Pohlmann says 54-year-old Timothy Gemelli of Slidell has been arrested on a charge of sexually abusing a girl below the age of 10 in Chalmette. He’s being held in lieu of $400,000 bond. Pohlmann says Gemelli also has lived in Longmont and Firestone, Colorado; Chicopee, Massachusetts; Picayune, Mississippi; and Harris County, Texas. Detectives want to know about possible victims in those areas. At the time of the alleged abuse, Gemelli lived in Chalmette. Sheriff’s spokesman Steve Cannizaro said Thursday that Gemelli does not yet have an attorney who could comment about the allegation.

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