logo graphic
logo graphic
listen live graphic
Advertisement
Advertisement

June 2004 - Report and Summary

The month of June 2004 was cooler and much wetter than normal. Measurable rain fell somewhere in East Texas each day during the month. The rain event had begun May 28, and continued into early July. The month was the sixth consecutive wet June. The last year in which near to below normal rainfall occurred was 1998. The month was 0.2 deg. warmer than June 2003, and 6.15 inches drier. Year-to-date rainfall through June 30 was 1.92 inches less in 2004 than the 29.43 inches through the same date in 2003. Precipitation through June 30, 2004 was 4.93 inches greater than normal. The thirty-day outlook for June 2004 had called for near normal temperatures and near normal precipitation.

The week of May 30-June 5 saw near normal temperatures and rainfall about 225 percent of normal.Measurable rain occurred somewhere in the area each day during the week. There were five severe weather events: on the evenings of the 30th, 31st, 1st, 2nd, and 5th. Those of the 1st and 2nd were most widespread. These resulted in widespread power outages, which continued into the 6th for some residents. Winds aloft were northwesterly for the week, with a frontal boundary wandering back and forth across the region. Add to that a very strong flow of moist air daily except on the 4th, and the heavy rains were the result. The week's average temperature was 78.2 deg., and precipitation was 2.20 inches. The week was 1.2 deg. cooler than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2003, the week was 1.7 deg. warmer and 0.41 inch wetter.

The week June 6-12 saw near normal temperatures, and about 200 percent of normal rainfall. The weather pattern changed early in the week, but the weather did not. The northwest flow event was replaced by an upper air trough over Central North America. Disturbances rotating around the base of that trough crossed the region, and brought periods of rain and thunderstorms. Rain fell somewhere in the area each day during the week. There was a severe weather outbreak on the afternoon of the 7th, which again knocked out electric power and telephone service to some residents. The week's average temperature was 79.0 deg., and rainfall totaled 1.72 inches. This was 0.8 deg. warmer than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2003, the week was 3.4 deg. warmer and 2.01 inches wetter.

The week June 13-19 saw near normal temperatures and near normal rainfall. Rain fell somewhere in the area each day during the week, with the 17th being the least active. Disturbances continued crossing the area around an upper air trough over the Central and Eastern United States. Weak cold fronts reached the area on the 5th and 19th. There were occurrences of severe weather on the afternoons of the 18th and 19th, though these were not general. There were several locations which received very heavy rains during the week. The extreme northeast, from Cass County northward to the Oklahoma border, appeared to receive the heaviest rains on the 18th and 19th, with parts of Bowie County picking up very heavy rain on the 16th. The week's average temperature was 79.6 deg., which was 0.6 deg. warmer than the previous week. Rainfall was 0.86 inch. Compared with the same week in 2003, the week was 2.9 deg. warmer and 5.96 inches drier.

The week June 20-26 saw temperatures about 3 deg. cooler than normal, and rainfall about 60 percent of normal. The rain figures are deceptive, as the southern counties received very heavy rain on two occasions. The Polar Vortex was centered over Ontario for much of the week. This brought down disturbances with their accompanying cold fronts. The result was lower temperatures and showers, since the frontal boundaries held in or near the area for a day or so after crossing. The week's average temperature was 77.6 deg., and precipitation was 0.42 inch. The temperature was 2.0 deg. cooler than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2003, the week was 2.7 deg. cooler, and 1.32 inches drier. Rain fell on each of the final four days of the month as an upper air trough persisted over the region. The Polar Vortex finally departed out of range, but the lingering trough did not go out until late on the 30th.

The sea-breeze front was active daily. In addition, disturbances, which formed out of earlier thunderstorm complexes over South Texas, enhanced shower formation. Several of the counties were under flash flood warning on the afternoons of the 28th, 29th, and 30th. Clouds and rain held down temperatures.

The reporting period for temperatures and phenomenon on each day is for the twenty-four hours ending at midnight hours GMT--6 p.m. CST and 7 p.m. CDT. The reporting period for precipitation is for the twenty-four hours ending at noon GMT--6 a.m. CST and 7 a.m. CDT. All times are given using the twenty-four hour clock, and are expressed in Greenwich Mean Time.

Observations are from NWS Station 41/9207/4 in Tyler, Texas. The term "normal" refers to averages from the standard climatic period 1971-2000.

June 2004

MX MN OBS PCPN REMARKS

June 2004, RECORDS AND SUMMARY:

Return to the index