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March 2007 - Report and Summary

The month of March 2007 was warmer and drier than normal. An abrupt transition occurred early in the month after an Arctic outbreak gave way to Tropical Maritime air for much of the remainder. Migratory storm systems caused heavy rainfall across much of the region. In fact, all of the surrounding stations reported above normal precipitation. Typical of the transition to Spring, there were severe weather outbreaks late in the month. Compared with March 2006, the month was 1.9 deg. Warmer and 2.96 inches drier. Year-to-date rainfall through month's end was 0.63 inch greater in 2006 than in 2007. The thirty-day outlook for March 2007 had called for near normal temperatures and near normal precipitation.

The week February 25-March 3 saw near normal temperatures and rainfall about 10 percent of normal. The week began with a warming trend, and ended blustery and A cold front crossed on the 1st. This was responsible for the week's only rainfall. The thunderstorm line, which formed in East Texas early that morning, later developed into a major severe weather event over the Southeastern United States. Strong and gusty south winds preceded the front on the 28th, and followed the front on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. The week's average temperature was 56.4 deg., which was 2.0 deg. Cooler than the previous week. Precipitation was 0.10 inch. Compared with the same week in 2006, the week was 5.5 deg. cooler, and 0.08 inch wetter.

The week March 4-10 saw near normal temperatures and no rainfall. After a chilly start, including the cool season's last freeze on the 5th, temperatures warmed rapidly under Tropical Maritime air. High pressure aloft prevented any rain from forming in the area, and augmented the much above normal temperatures at week's end. The week's average temperature was 57.4 deg., which was 1.0 deg. Warmer than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2006, the week was 12.9 deg. Colder, and 0.48 inch drier.

The week March 11-17 saw temperatures about 4 degrees above normal, and near normal rainfall. Warm temperatures continued for most of the week, until a blustery cold front arrived on the 16th. Earlier in the week, a slow-moving closed low brought rainfall to the region. Amounts of between three and six inches were common over the south, causing flooding on the Navasota River, which broadened to 1.5 miles at Normangee. Amounts over the central and north were under one inch, held down by the track of the low along the Texas Gulf Coast. Little rain was associated with the cold front. The week's average temperature was 63.6 deg., which was 6.2 deg. Warmer than the previous week. Rainfall was 0.85 inch. Compared with the same week in 2006, the week was 1.5 deg. Warmer, and 0.21 inch drier.

The week March 18-24 saw temperatures about 7 degrees above normal and no measurable rainfall. Tropical Maritime air was in control of the region's weather during nearly the entire week. A weak cold front on the 21st brought only a trace of rainfall, and very slight cooling. The week's average temperature was 69.4., 5.8 deg. Warmer than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2006, the week was 7.3 deg. Warmer and 1.06 inches drier.

The week March 25-31 saw temperatures about 7 degrees warmer than normal, and rainfall about 200 percent of normal. Two major rain-producing storms affected the area during the week. The first, on the 26th-27th, brought flood-producing rains over the southwestern counties, which ran up to four inches. The second, on the 30th/31st, repeated the favor, with between four and eight inches of rain across the south. There were occurrences of severe weather with both storm features over the east on the 27th, and the west on the morning and evening of the 30th. Tropical Maritime air was the dominant air mass until modified Polar Continental air moved in behind the cold front of the 31st. The week's average temperature was 70.4, and precipitation was 1.80 inches. This was 1.0 deg. Warmer than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2006, the week was 6.4 deg. Warmer and 1.31 inches wetter.

The reporting period for temperatures and phenomenon on each day is for the twenty-four hours ending at midnight hours GMT--6 p.m. CST and 7 p.m. CDT. The reporting period for precipitation is for the twenty-four hours ending at noon GMT--6 a.m. CST and 7 a.m. CDT. All times are given using the twenty-four hour clock, and are expressed in Greenwich Mean Time.

Observations are from NWS Station 41/9207/4 in Tyler, Texas. The term "normal" refers to averages from the standard climatic period 1971-2000.

March 2007

MX MN OBS PCPN REMARKS

March 2007, RECORDS AND SUMMARY:

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