logo graphic
logo graphic
listen live graphic
Advertisement
Advertisement

October 2005 - Report and Summary

The month of October 2005 saw near normal temperatures and much below normal precipitation. It was a month of sharp temperature contrasts, reflected in the fact that both heating and cooling degree-day totals were well above normal. Compared with the same month in 2004, the month was 5.8 deg. cooler, and 3.23 inches drier. Year-to-date rainfall through month's end was 14.99 inches less this year than last, reflecting the fact that the area remained in severe drought. The thirty-day outlook for October 2005 had called for near normal temperatures and near normal precipitation.

The week September 25-October 1 saw temperatures about 6 deg. above normal, and rainfall about 10 percent of normal. The upper air high pressure ridge persisted until a cold front arrived on the evening of the 28th. The week's rain was lingering effects from Rita. No rain accompanied the cold front. By late-week, the upper air high pressure ridge had re- established itself, and temperatures returned to above normal levels. The week's average temperature was 80.1 deg., which was 3.5 deg. cooler than the previous week. Rainfall was 0.12 inch. Compared with the same week in 2004, the week was 6.3 deg. warmer, and 0.32 inch drier.

The week October 2-8 saw temperatures about 3 deg. warmer than normal, and rainfall about 5 percent of normal. Upper air high pressure again dominated early in the week, keeping temperatures well above normal. A cold front, arriving on the morning of the 6th, abruptly lowered temperatures. Upper air low pressure, crossing on the 8th, brought the week's only rainfall. The week's average temperature was 74.4 deg., which was 5.7 deg. cooler than the previous week. Precipitation was 0.05 inch. Compared with the same week in 2004, the week was 2.2 deg. warmer, and 2.14 inches drier.

The week October 9-15 saw near normal temperatures and no rainfall. A dry surface high pressure ridge dominated the areaþs weather on the 9th, and between the 12th and 15th. This resulted in low humidities, cool nighttime and warm daytime readings. Two upper air storms were over Southwest Texas. The first brought light rain to the northwestern half of the region on the 12th and 13th, though no rain fell in Tyler. The week's average temperature was 69.2 deg., which was 5.2 deg. cooler than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2004, the week was 2.6 deg. warmer and 1.08 inches drier.

The week October 16-22 saw temperatures about 6 deg. warmer than normal, and no rainfall. Through the 20th, surface and upper air high pressure dominated the region's weather. The surface high was responsible for low humidities early in the week, and higher humidities at mid- week as the center moved to the east of the region. The upper air high, centered over North Mexico, was responsible for the high temperatures. Indeed, record high readings were reached on the 17th and 18th. On the night of the 20th, a cold front passed through the region. It caused a few light showers over the northwest earlier that day, and lowered temperatures to near normal levels for late- week. The week's average temperature was 71.6, which was 2.4 deg. warmer than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2004, the week was 7.0 deg. cooler, and 0.28 inch drier.

The week October 23-29 saw temperatures about 8 deg. below normal, and no rainfall. Polar Continental air built into the region on the 23rd, with a reinforcing cool surge on the 27th. The air mass was very dry throughout the week, resulting in virtually clear skies all week long and much below normal nighttime temperatures. A few stations across the east and northeast experienced freezes on the 24th, 25th, and 28th. No freeze occurred in Tyler, though patchy frost formed in the city on the mornings of the 24th and 25th. The week was 15.4 deg. cooler than the previous week. Compared with the same week in 2004, the week was 20.1 deg. cooler, and 0.39 inch drier. Had it not been for general rain on the 31st, October 2005 would have gone into the record books as the third driest October on record. However, a line of thunderstorms moved into the area from the northwest at mid-day ahead of a cold front. General rains of between one-half and two inches fell in the region, with a few occurrences of severe weather to the southeast of Tyler.

The reporting period for temperatures and phenomenon on each day is for the twenty-four hours ending at midnight hours GMT--6 p.m. CST and 7 p.m. CDT. The reporting period for precipitation is for the twenty-four hours ending at noon GMT--6 a.m. CST and 7 a.m. CDT. All times are given using the twenty-four hour clock, and are expressed in Greenwich Mean Time.

Observations are from NWS Station 41/9207/4 in Tyler, Texas. The term "normal" refers to averages from the standard climatic period 1971-2000.

October 2005

MX MN OBS PCPN REMARKS

October 2005, RECORDS AND SUMMARY:

Return to the index