KTBB.com Frequently Asked Questions

You may send us a question or comment by using either our general Contact Page or you may Ask the General Manager.

What is KTBB’s mailing address?


You may send mail to:
KTBB AM600 Radio
1001 E.S.E. Loop 323 Ste 455
Tyler, Texas 75701

Or phone numbers are:
Main Office: (903)-593-2519
Fax: (903)-597-8378
KTBB AM600 Studio Line: (903)-593-5822


How can I correct a news story?


I saw a news story on your site that contained incorrect information, who do I contact about that?

Answer:

Please either call our offices (903)-593-2519 and ask for the news dept, use the Contact Us Page or you can send an e-mail directly to news@ktbb.com. We will take your information, investigate and make corrections if needed.


Will you be streaming Texas Rangers games online?


ANSWER:

Unfortunately no, we will not.

Major League Baseball retains Internet streaming rights. Individual teams are not allowed to offer streaming in their agreements with their radio network affiliates.

I’m sorry for this. But our hands are tied.


When I click the link the streaming player won’t open.


Make sure that your browser is set to allow popup windows from ktbb.com and securenetsystems.net.

How do I enable or disable pop-ups in web browsers?

If you would rather listen without the popup player you can use the direct player links.

KTBB AM600
http://radio.securenetsystems.net/radio_player_large.cfm?stationCallSign=KTBB

ESPN 92.1FM
http://radio.securenetsystems.net/radio_player_large.cfm?stationCallSign=KYZS

These will open the player in the existing window.

The MP3 streams (found on the homepage or live audio page) are also useful – they can be pasted into media player or Winamp. The MP3 stream links are:

KTBB AM600

http://ice7.securenetsystems.net/KTBBM

ESPN 92.1FM

http://ice7.securenetsystems.net/KYZSM


How do I enable or disable pop-ups in web browsers?


Internet Explorer 9

At the upper right, click the Tools icon, and select Internet options.

Click the Privacy tab.

Check or uncheck Turn on Pop-up Blocker.

Note: To access advanced features, in the “Pop-up Blocker” section, click Settings…

 

Internet Explorer 8 and 7

From the Tools menu, select Pop-up Blocker.

Click to select either Turn Off Pop-up Blocker or Turn On Pop-up Blocker.

By default, Internet Explorer displays pop-ups that appear as a result of clicking a link or button. Pop-up Blocker blocks pop-ups that are displayed automatically (without your clicking a link or button). To allow a specific web site to display automatic pop-ups:

Click Tools, select Pop-up Blocker, and then click Pop-up Blocker Settings.

In the “Address of website to allow” box, type the address (or URL) of the web site you want to see pop-ups from, and then click Add.

Repeat step 2 for every web site you want to allow pop-ups from. When you are finished adding web sites, click Close.

 

Firefox

In Windows, from the Tools menu, select Options…

If the menu bar is hidden, press Alt to make it visible.

In Mac OS X, from the Firefox menu, select Preferences…
Click Content.

Check or uncheck Block Popup Windows.

When blocking a pop-up, Firefox displays an information bar, as well as an icon in the status bar. When you click either the Options button in the information bar or the icon in the status bar, a menu is displayed with the following choices:

Allow/Block popups for this site

Edit Popup Blocker Options

Note: If you select Edit Popup Blocker Options, you can then click Exceptions next to “Block pop-up windows” and enter the URLs for any sites on which you wish to allow pop-ups.
Don’t show this message (info message) when popups are blocked

Show (the particular blocked pop-up)

 

Safari

From the Safari (in Mac OS X) or Edit (in Windows) menu, select Block Pop-Up Windows.

 

Google Chrome

At the upper right, click the wrench icon, and select Settings (Preferences in Mac OS X and Linux).

Click Under the Hood.

In the “Privacy” section, click Content settings… .

In the “Pop-ups” section, select Allow all sites to show pop-ups or Do not allow any site to show pop-ups (recommended). To customize permissions for specific websites, click Manage exceptions.


What happened to Radiolicious? How do I listen on my smart phone?


Radiolicious is no longer needed to listen to our stations on your mobile device. If you are using any of the major smart phones (iPhone Android, Blackberry) you should be automatically directed to our mobile site where you will see buttons to access each of the station streams. The direct URL for the mobile site is www.mobile.ktbb.com but you should be automatically redirected if you are on a smart phone capable of doing so. (more…)


What happened to David Smoak?


David Smoak left KTBB for reasons that we cannot disclose at this time.

Bill Coates is now hosting SportsTalk every weekday afternoon at 4:00 p.m. on KTBB FM 92.1. Bill is an experienced, talented, network-quality sports broadcasting professional with over 30 years in the business and over 19 years at KTBB. Bill brings and encyclopedic knowledge of professional, collegiate and high school sports together with an easy, inviting conversational style. We are excited to have Bill on the air in a long-form format and we expect him to take SportsTalk to a new level in the coming months.


I would like to contact your offices, or one of your staff, how would I do so?


There are a number of ways to contact us:
You call our offices at this number (903)-593-2519
You may send us a fax: Office Fax: 903-597-4141 | Sales Fax: 903-597-8378 | News Fax: 903-593-4918 | Sports Fax: 903-509-3986
Sports E-mail: sports at ktbb dot com
News E-mail: news at ktbb dot com
You may use the form on our CONTACT PAGE to send us your comments or questions.

You may send a letter or card to:
KTBB AM 600
1001 ESE Loop 323
Suite 455
Tyler, TX 75701


I missed one of your shows, is it possible to obtain a copy of that show? Do you offer podcasts of your daily programming?


Yes, if the show in question is part of our MP3/Podcasting program. The following shows are available, for 1 week, for download and podcasting:

More information and a list of available podcasts:


Would you consider changing your on the hour and half hour news from ABC?


ANSWER
Changing networks to move away from ABC is not an option for us. There are a
number of reasons.

First let me respond to the belief held by you and a number of others that
ABC News Radio displays a liberal bias. As you may know from my weekly
feature called “You Tell Me” (www.ktbb.com/youtellme) I am a committed
conservative. KTBB’s hospitality to conservative thought is well-evidenced
by the fact that we are the home in East Texas for Glenn Beck, Rush
Limbaugh, Sean Hannity and Michael Savage.

If you believe that ABC displays a liberal bias, you join a fairly large
chorus of others. But when you examine that belief closely, you will almost
always find that the liberal bias charge pertains principally to the news
product on the ABC Television Network, mainly their flagship broadcast ABC
World News with Charles Gibson.

I am not going to debate whether or not ABC News as seen on television is
biased. Some very reasonable and well-informed people believe that it is.
Others believe otherwise.

What I am going to dwell on is the product we get from ABC News Radio. The
ABC News Radio newsroom is in a separate building in a separate part of town
in New York from the ABC newsroom that serves the television network. ABC
News Radio uses separate staff and separate facilities. On big stories, the
radio network and the television network will occasionally share some
technical facilities and may exchange audio with each other. But for the
vast majority of the time, radio news and television news each create their
own products separate and apart from each other.

And in general, the ABC News Radio people are much less impressed with
themselves than the people at the television network.

“But,” you say, “I hear Charles Gibson on your radio station every day.” Yes
you do. Charles Gibson does the first two mintues (which is all we clear) of
the top-of-the-hour newscast at 4 p.m. central time. This is largely a
promotional effort on behalf of ABC News promoting the evening television
network newscast “ABC World News.” The Charles Gibson radio newscast is
written by the radio news desk and the copy is sent to Charles Gibson to
read. I have seen the process first-hand at big news events that I have
covered such as the New Hampshire Primary and the two political conventions
this summer. With respect to editorial content, the radio newscast featuring
Charles Gibson’s voice remains a radio product.

My eyes are wide open on this. If you were to ask me to make a bet, I would
bet that the majority of the staff in the New York and Washington newsrooms
of ABC News Radio vote Democrat. I would bet everything that I own that Ann
Compton, ABC News Radio White House correspondent since the administration
of Gerald Ford, is a liberal Democrat as well.

Before George W. Bush was governor or president, he lived near my home in
Dallas and we belonged to Highland Park United Methodist Church. I saw him
every Sunday morning and over a period of several years, I struck up a
casual friendship with him and consider him a friend to this day.

Thus, for the past eight years, I have listened to Ann Compton’s coverage of
the Bush White House with a very critical ear. To my ear, Ann has been
consummately professional. In nearly eight years of the administration of a
man I voted for and count as a friend, I have not heard Ann step over the
line once. If I had, I would not have hesitated to let the network hear from
me.

I have worked literally elbow-to-elbow at major news events with the people
you hear on the ABC Radio Network every day. I’m talking about Doug
Limerick, Aaron Katersky, Vic Ratner, Steven Portnoy and others. I can tell
you from personal experience that these people are professionals who are
trying to do a professional job. They likely are liberal Democrats and they
bring, as we all do, their personal biases with them to work. But I have
never heard or observed any of them actively pursuing an agenda-driven
reporting bias.

On to a couple of other points…

Many who write or call us to complain about ABC suggest that we affiliate
with the Fox News Radio Network.

That is not a practical option. With respect to radio, Fox News is little
more than a brand name and a minimal top-of-the-hour news product. It offers
none of the resources of ABC News Radio. A single example is ABC Newscall.
This is a service to radio affiliates that makes audio cuts from the news
available on a searchable database. It is updated 24 hours a day, seven days
a week, 365 days a year. We make use of Newscall every morning in preparing
the KTBB Morning News. It is something that we would never want to live
without.

Fox News does not offer a comparable product.

When a major story breaks, ABC News Radio has people and equipment and
resources developed over the past 50 years to cover it. Fox News Radio does
not. On a major story, they can offer affiliates little other than
re-purposed TV audio that is, by the very process of re-purposing it,
delayed from real time.

A number of radio stations that left the CBS Radio Network and ABC News
Radio to join Fox have quietly re-affliated with one or the other. They may
still run the Fox newscast on the top of the hour, but if a big story
breaks, these stations revert to ABC or CBS.

We at KTBB have been able to cover major stories such as the past four
political conventions, the key anniveraries of 9/11, the election of Pope
Benedict XVI and other stories because of the resources that ABC offers its
affiliates. As an example, both ABC and CBS had “Radio Row” installations
for affiliates at the political conventions. This is a service, however,
that Fox News does not offer its affiliates.

As I said at the outset, I am a committed conservative. I believe that media
bias is a serious and growing problem. I can make the argument that
journalism in America as we have defined it for generations is in very
serious jeopardy. I believe that the major TV networks and a number of large
daily newspapers have wittingly or unwittingly tilted their coverage so
severely as to have forfeited the public trust.

But, with that belief as background, I have not been unhappy with the
product we have been getting from ABC News Radio.

Thank your for listening and offering your comments.


Do you have any plans to boost your stations signal strength?


ANSWER
Yours is a question we get nearly every fall.

If it were up to us, we’d be on the air at 100 kilowatts. The equipment to broadcast at a higher power output is relatively cheap and, despite the high energy costs that so dominate the headlines as I write this, so is the electricity.

If we could, we’d go buy a gangbusters transmitter and crank it all the way up.

And so would every other broadcaster.

Therein lies the problem.

If every broadcaster simply put as much signal in the air as he or she had the checkbook to buy, the spectrum would be a chaotic jumble of useless noise.

Which is what was rapidly becoming the case in the late 1920s and early 1930s as the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) was formed and that agency began allocating frequencies, power and directionality.

When the sun sets, KTBB, like most AM radio stations, changes its power and the directions in which it most strongly radiates its signal.

Radio Frequency energy (RF) in what is commonly called the AM band (535 kHz to 1700 kHz) has a characteristic called the skywave. During the day, ionization of the atmosphere by the sun suppresses the skywave and your receiver detects only the groundwave. But at night, when solar energy is gone, the skywave is “free” to travel great distances. As a result, the skywave of a station in Tyler, Texas can cause severe interference for a station in a state as far away as either coast. The skywave effect diminishes with an increase in frequency (dial position). Therefore, a station that is low on the dial like KTBB at 600 kHz will have a very significant skywave component.

To deal with this physical property of AM radio, the FCC allocated radio stations in the U.S. in such a way that some stations are fully powered both day and night, a great many stations are only on the air in the daytime and the rest operate at a higher power by day and a lower power by night.

KTBB is in the last group of stations. Our daytime power is 5,000 watts. Our nighttime power is 2,500 watts. We change power at local sunrise and local sunset. As you know, that time changes with the changing of the seasons. As I write this, our power-up time on KTBB is 7:30 a.m. CDT and our power-down time is 6:45 p.m. CDT As I mentioned, those times change as the seasons change.

As if that weren’t enough, KTBB, like most AM stations, uses a directional antenna system. Simply put, we radiate our signal more strongly in some directions than in others. This, too, is to provide protection from interference to stations in other communities that also operate on our frequency (600 kHz) as well as to stations in other communities that operate on frequencies adjacent to ours (580 kHz, 590 kHz, 610 kHz, and 620 kHz). Our directional pattern changes for daytime and nighttime operation at the same times that our power changes. Our pattern is such that we do not radiate as strongly to the east toward Longview at night as we do in the daytime. Also, we protect KLBJ(AM) in Austin. They are at 590 on the dial, the first adjacent channel to us at 600 kHz. Thus, we “pull in our horns” to the south as the sun sets.

The question that always follows is, “Well, can’t you do something to raise your power.” And the answer that must follow is, “No, we can’t.” The AM Table of Allotments for the United States is a giant jigsaw puzzle. What we do will affect our neighboring AM stations, which will affect their neighbors and so on. So what we have is for all intents and purposes fixed. I hope this answers your question.

You can view a table listing of the AVERAGE HOURS OF SUNRISE AND SUNSET by clicking on this link: Sun Hours

Many of our listeners that are affected by our power and pattern changes are making use of our web streaming service. If you live in the Tyler-Longview metropolitan survey area as defined by ARBITRON, the radio ratings company, you can subscribe to our streaming service for only $0.99 and you can listen on any computer you own.

The eligible counties of residence are Smith, Gregg & Cherokee.

Click here: Live Audio subscription information.

I appreciate your interest and I hope I have answered your question.
Paul L. Gleiser
President


Why can’t I get your station 600 am before 7:30 in the morning?


ANSWER
Yours is a question we get frequently at this time of year as the sun begins rising later and setting earlier. You didn’t specify where you live in the area so my answer will be general in nature. But put simply, as the sun rises and sets, KTBB, like most AM radio stations, changes its power and the direction in which it more strongly radiates its signal.

A little technical information. Radio Frequency energy (RF) in what is commonly called the AM band (535 kHz to 1700 kHz) has a characteristic called the skywave. During the day, ionization of the atmosphere by the sun suppresses the skywave and your receiver detects only the groundwave. But at night, when solar energy is gone, the skywave is “free” to travel great distances. As a result, the skywave of a station in Tyler, Texas can cause severe interference for a station in a state as far away as either coast. The skywave effect diminishes with an increase in frequency (dial position). Therefore, a station that is low on the dial like KTBB at 600 kHz will have a very significant skywave component.

To deal with this physical property of AM radio, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allocated radio stations in the U.S. in such a way that some stations are fully powered both day and night, a great many stations are only on the air in the daytime and the rest operate at a higher power by day and a lower power by night.

KTBB is in the last group of stations. Our daytime power is 5,000 watts. Our nighttime power is 2,500 watts. We change power at local sunrise and local sunset. As you know, that time changes with the changing of the seasons. As I write this, our power-up time on KTBB is 7:30 a.m. and our power-down time is 7:45 p.m. As I mentioned, those times change as the seasons change.

As if that weren’t enough, KTBB, like most AM stations, uses a directional antenna system. Simply put, we radiate our signal more strongly in some directions than in others. This, too, is to provide protection from interference to stations in other communities that also operate on our frequency (600 kHz) as well as to stations in other communities that operate on frequencies adjacent to ours (580 kHz, 590 kHz, 610 kHz, and 620 kHz). Our directional pattern changes for daytime and nighttime operation at the same times that our power changes. Our pattern is such that we do not radiate as strongly to the east toward Longview at night as we do in the daytime.

The question that always follows is, “Well, can’t you do something to raise your power.” And the answer that must follow is, “No, we can’t.” The AM Table of Allotments for the United States is a giant jigsaw puzzle. What we do will affect our neighboring AM stations, which will affect their neighbors and so on. So what we have is for all intents and purposes fixed. I hope this answers your question.

You can view a table listing of the AVERAGE HOURS OF SUNRISE AND SUNSET by clicking on the link below:

http://www.ktbb.com/sunhours.php

I appreciate your interest.

Paul L. Gleiser
President


How do I add my event to your Calendar of Events?


To get your events listed here you can mail your info to:

KTBB/KDOK Radio Attn: Calendar of Events c/o: Mike Edwards 1001 ESE Loop 323, Tyler Texas 75701

Or Fax them to: (903)-593-4918. You can also e-mail Mike your items. Send to medwards at ktbb dot com


How do I bookmark your site?


Internet Explorer 6.x and higher
Bookmark ktbb.com
Go to the www.ktbb.com home page.
Go to the “Favorites” menu (not the “Favorites Folder” on the button bar) and choose “Add to Favorites.”
To go to our home page at any time, click on the “Bookmarks” menu and choose “KTBB AM600- NEWS, TALK, SPORTS ON THE WEB”

Alternately, you may drag the icon in the “Address” box to the “Favorites Folder” on the “Button Bar.”

Mozilla/Firefox 1.x and higher
Bookmark ktbb.com
Go to the www.ktbb.com home page.
Go to the “Bookmarks” menu and choose “Bookmark This Page.”
To go to our home page at any time, click on the “Bookmarks” menu and choose “KTBB AM600- NEWS, TALK, SPORTS ON THE WEB”


How do I make your site my homepage?


Internet Explorer 6.x and higher

Make ktbb.com Your Home Page
Go to the www.ktbb.com front page.
Go to the “Tools” menu and choose “Internet Options.”
Click on the “General” tab.
Click on the “Use Current” button.
Click “OK.”

Mozilla/Firefox 1.x and higher

Make ktbb.com Your Home Page
Go to the www.ktbb.com front page.
Go to the “Edit” menu and choose “Preferences.”
Select “Navigator” from the Category list on the left.
Click on the “Use Current Page” button.
Click “OK.”


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